Mathematics of Aperiodic Order

Progress in Mathematics

Book 309
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What is order that is not based on simple repetition, that is, periodicity? How must atoms be arranged in a material so that it diffracts like a quasicrystal? How can we describe aperiodically ordered systems mathematically?

Originally triggered by the – later Nobel prize-winning – discovery of quasicrystals, the investigation of aperiodic order has since become a well-established and rapidly evolving field of mathematical research with close ties to a surprising variety of branches of mathematics and physics.

This book offers an overview of the state of the art in the field of aperiodic order, presented in carefully selected authoritative surveys. It is intended for non-experts with a general background in mathematics, theoretical physics or computer science, and offers a highly accessible source of first-hand information for all those interested in this rich and exciting field. Topics covered include the mathematical theory of diffraction, the dynamical systems of tilings or Delone sets, their cohomology and non-commutative geometry, the Pisot substitution conjecture, aperiodic Schrödinger operators, and connections to arithmetic number theory.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Birkhäuser
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Published on
Jun 5, 2015
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Pages
428
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ISBN
9783034809030
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Mathematics / Functional Analysis
Mathematics / Geometry / Algebraic
Mathematics / Geometry / Analytic
Mathematics / Geometry / General
Mathematics / Linear & Nonlinear Programming
Mathematics / Mathematical Analysis
Mathematics / Number Theory
Mathematics / Numerical Analysis
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This content is DRM protected.
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This memoir develops, discusses and compares a range of commutative and non-commutative invariants defined for projection method tilings and point patterns. The projection method refers to patterns, particularly the quasiperiodic patterns, constructed by the projection of a strip of a high dimensional integer lattice to a smaller dimensional Euclidean space. In the first half of the memoir the acceptance domain is very general - any compact set which is the closure of its interior - while in the second half we concentrate on the so-called canonical patterns. The topological invariants used are various forms of $K$-theory and cohomology applied to a variety of both $C^*$-algebras and dynamical systems derived from such a pattern.The invariants considered all aim to capture geometric properties of the original patterns, such as quasiperiodicity or self-similarity, but one of the main motivations is also to provide an accessible approach to the the $K_0$ group of the algebra of observables associated to a quasicrystal with atoms arranged on such a pattern. The main results provide complete descriptions of the (unordered) $K$-theory and cohomology of codimension 1 projection patterns, formulae for these invariants for codimension 2 and 3 canonical projection patterns, general methods for higher codimension patterns and a closed formula for the Euler characteristic of arbitrary canonical projection patterns.Computations are made for the Ammann-Kramer tiling. Also included are qualitative descriptions of these invariants for generic canonical projection patterns. Further results include an obstruction to a tiling arising as a substitution and an obstruction to a substitution pattern arising as a projection. One corollary is that, generically, projection patterns cannot be derived via substitution systems.
This book features a series of lectures that explores three different fields in which functor homology (short for homological algebra in functor categories) has recently played a significant role. For each of these applications, the functor viewpoint provides both essential insights and new methods for tackling difficult mathematical problems.

In the lectures by Aurélien Djament, polynomial functors appear as coefficients in the homology of infinite families of classical groups, e.g. general linear groups or symplectic groups, and their stabilization. Djament’s theorem states that this stable homology can be computed using only the homology with trivial coefficients and the manageable functor homology. The series includes an intriguing development of Scorichenko’s unpublished results.

The lectures by Wilberd van der Kallen lead to the solution of the general cohomological finite generation problem, extending Hilbert’s fourteenth problem and its solution to the context of cohomology. The focus here is on the cohomology of algebraic groups, or rational cohomology, and the coefficients are Friedlander and Suslin’s strict polynomial functors, a conceptual form of modules over the Schur algebra.

Roman Mikhailov’s lectures highlight topological invariants: homoto

py and homology of topological spaces, through derived functors of polynomial functors. In this regard the functor framework makes better use of naturality, allowing it to reach calculations that remain beyond the grasp of classical algebraic topology.

Lastly, Antoine Touzé’s introductory course on homological algebra makes the book accessible to graduate students new to the field.

The links between functor homology and the three fields mentioned above offer compelling arguments for pushing the development of the functor viewpoint. The lectures in this book will provide readers with a feel for functors, and a valuable new perspective to apply to their favourite problems.

This memoir develops, discusses and compares a range of commutative and non-commutative invariants defined for projection method tilings and point patterns. The projection method refers to patterns, particularly the quasiperiodic patterns, constructed by the projection of a strip of a high dimensional integer lattice to a smaller dimensional Euclidean space. In the first half of the memoir the acceptance domain is very general - any compact set which is the closure of its interior - while in the second half we concentrate on the so-called canonical patterns. The topological invariants used are various forms of $K$-theory and cohomology applied to a variety of both $C^*$-algebras and dynamical systems derived from such a pattern.The invariants considered all aim to capture geometric properties of the original patterns, such as quasiperiodicity or self-similarity, but one of the main motivations is also to provide an accessible approach to the the $K_0$ group of the algebra of observables associated to a quasicrystal with atoms arranged on such a pattern. The main results provide complete descriptions of the (unordered) $K$-theory and cohomology of codimension 1 projection patterns, formulae for these invariants for codimension 2 and 3 canonical projection patterns, general methods for higher codimension patterns and a closed formula for the Euler characteristic of arbitrary canonical projection patterns.Computations are made for the Ammann-Kramer tiling. Also included are qualitative descriptions of these invariants for generic canonical projection patterns. Further results include an obstruction to a tiling arising as a substitution and an obstruction to a substitution pattern arising as a projection. One corollary is that, generically, projection patterns cannot be derived via substitution systems.
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