Expository Discourses on the First Epistle of the Apostle Peter

R. Carter & Brothers
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Publisher
R. Carter & Brothers
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Published on
Dec 31, 1851
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Pages
802
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Language
English
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After the Introduction (pp. 1-29), his first subject is The Christian Salvation (30-60); next is, The Present and Future State of the Christian Contrasted (pp.61-79); The Final Happiness of the Christians (80-104); Christian Duty (pp. 105-163), etc. Under each of these subjects, there are extensive sub-heads. Under Christian Duty are: The general view; the particular view; the means of performance of Christian Duty; Motives to the performance of Christian Duty; The holiness of God; The strict equity of God, etc. There are segments for all the verses, but the discourse may not take up a verse word-for-word. The comments are excellent in every way. The reader will meet with many beautiful facets of the Truth in this epistle which cannot be found in any other exposition of this book. Each page is studded with Scripture references from both Testaments, all of them magnify the light being thrown on the subject. For instance, in dealing with the expression ""a peculiar people,"" Brown points out that the original means ""a people for possession"" Or, ""treasure,"" and he brings in no less than 12 scripture references, all of them demonstrating that God's people are His treasure: 'He makes it evident that the Lord has set apart the godly man for Himself; and, ""in the day that He shall make up His jewels,"" collect His treasure, He will bestow on them such ""an exceeding weight of glory"" as shall make all the intelligent universe acknowledge that they are HIS; in a peculiar sense His property, . . ."" Spurgeon remarked that all of John Brown's ""expositions are of the utmost value;"" ""pure gold,"" and that he was ""a Puritan born out of time."" ""Has stood the test of time. Full and complete. Indispensable to the expositor"" (The Minister's Library, Cyril J. Barber).
In this original and collaborative creation, John Brown-Childs offers unique insights into some of the central problems facing communities, social movements, and people who desire social change: how does one build a movement that can account for race, class and gender, and yet still operate across all of these lines? How can communities sustain themselves in truly social ways? And perhaps most important, how can we take the importance of community into account without forgoing the important distinctions that we all ascribe to ourselves as individuals?Borrowing from the Haudenosaunee, or Iroquois federation, Brown-Childs offers a way of thinking about communities as coalitions, ones that account for differences in the very act of coming together. Using the Iroquois as an example of transcommunality in action, he also offers specific outcomes that many people desire—racial justice and peace are two examples—as points of focus around which many disparate groups may organize, without ever subsuming questions of identity as an expense of organizing.In addition to Brown-Childs' own exegesis, twelve scholars and thinkers from all walks of life offer their own responses to his thinking, enriching the book as an illustration and example of transcommunality.In an age of fractured identities and a world that is moving toward a global community, Transcommunality offers a persuasive way of imagining the world where community and individual identity may not only coexist, but also depend upon the other to the benefit of both.
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