Netliving 101: Networking Life's Journey

AuthorHouse
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"It is not what you know, but who you know that counts." This old cliche is as true today as it was when it was first uttered. According to a recent survey conducted by Drake Beam Morin, Inc. (a large outplacement organization), networking fills 70 percent of professional positions. Networking for a job is the best way to tap into the unpublished job market. NETLIVING 101, Networking Life's Journey reaches beyond the job market into all aspects of life from the womb to the tomb. Hence the word networking is replaced by my newly coined word netliving .

There is currently no book, as indicated by reviewing Books in Print ,that shows people how to take advantage of networking techniques used in job hunting to enhance other facets of their lives. NETLIVING 101, Networking Life's Journey fills that gap by providing all the tools and information readers need to establish networks and have more enjoyable and successful lives. One of the reasons for choosing the title NETLIVING 101, Networking Life's Journey was because, to the best of my knowledge, no college or university offers a course as part of a curriculum on the subject.

In earlier, simpler times when most of the world's population lived in small villages where everyone knew their neighbor, there was no need to build networks for they were already in place. The local church or pub was usually the hub of the network. With the complexity of today's society it has become necessary to make a concerted effort to establish support networks in order to be successful and happy.

In this self-help book, ideas, examples and suggestions for netliving are developed through short vignettes based on the lives of real people. Names and places will be changed to protect the innocent.

NETLIVING 101, Networking Life's Journey

is written using the concept known as faction. Essentially, faction refers to the inclusion of certain details which, although they may not have occurred exactly as described in point of fact, give the reader a clear image of the scene in his or her imagination. Rather than telling the reader what netliving is all about, this book demonstrates through the words and actions of the characters. Chapter One introduces the two key characters that appear throughout the book. Roberta and Richard are used alternately, from chapter to chapter, to provide different perspectives. The fabric of friendships is woven through the stages of life and applied to various life experiences from overcoming the fear of public speaking to preparing for retirement.

Netliving 101, Networking Life's Journey is designed for individuals who are career oriented, sophisticated, and thoughtful. Most people are concerned about their future and are taking steps to afford themselves successful, happy and prosperous "mature years."

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About the author

John Cuthbert Durkin, better known to his friends as "Jack," was born and raised in Western Pennsylvania. He has been a practicing "netliver" since age ten when he purchased a daily newspaper route for ten dollars. Netliving the paper route's customer base developed into lawn mowing and baby-sitting opportunities. The local country club's caddymaster lived on his paper route and assisted him with choice job assignments on weekends, giving him his first significant view of netliving in action.

As a human resource executive for more than thirty-five years, he successfully utilized netliving principles and practices to fill job openings and obtain other critical benchmark data. During this time period, he also facilitated dozens of workshops both within his employer's organization and outside it on a voluntary basis for various causes.

The "Alumni Career Network" at his alma mater was developed and chaired by him. He also chaired "New Careers for Older Americans," the function of which was to find positions for displaced order workers using the netliving approach in the job search.

A navy veteran, his formal education consists of a BS degree in Sociology from John Carroll University and an MBA from Kent State University. John Carroll University, where he taught a human resource overview course for twelve years as an adjunct professor, awarded him its highest honor, the Alumni Medal, in 1992.

In 1995, he was chosen as the Outstanding member of the Cleveland Chapter of the Society for Human Resource Management. Currently, he operates a successful Human Resource Consulting business utilizing netliving techniques.

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Additional Information

Publisher
AuthorHouse
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Published on
Oct 4, 2000
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Pages
276
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ISBN
9781477280348
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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J. D. Vance
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

"A riveting book."—The Wall Street Journal

"Essential reading."—David Brooks, New York Times

From a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a powerful account of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class

Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over forty years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.

The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually their grandchild (the author) would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of their success in achieving generational upward mobility.

But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that this is only the short, superficial version. Vance’s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother, struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, and were never able to fully escape the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. Vance piercingly shows how he himself still carries around the demons of their chaotic family history.

A deeply moving memoir with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.

Kathryn J. Edin
David Brooks
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE ECONOMIST • “I wrote this book not sure I could follow the road to character, but I wanted at least to know what the road looks like and how other people have trodden it.”—David Brooks

With the wisdom, humor, curiosity, and sharp insights that have brought millions of readers to his New York Times column and his previous bestsellers, David Brooks has consistently illuminated our daily lives in surprising and original ways. In The Social Animal, he explored the neuroscience of human connection and how we can flourish together. Now, in The Road to Character, he focuses on the deeper values that should inform our lives. Responding to what he calls the culture of the Big Me, which emphasizes external success, Brooks challenges us, and himself, to rebalance the scales between our “résumé virtues”—achieving wealth, fame, and status—and our “eulogy virtues,” those that exist at the core of our being: kindness, bravery, honesty, or faithfulness, focusing on what kind of relationships we have formed.

Looking to some of the world’s greatest thinkers and inspiring leaders, Brooks explores how, through internal struggle and a sense of their own limitations, they have built a strong inner character. Labor activist Frances Perkins understood the need to suppress parts of herself so that she could be an instrument in a larger cause. Dwight Eisenhower organized his life not around impulsive self-expression but considered self-restraint. Dorothy Day, a devout Catholic convert and champion of the poor, learned as a young woman the vocabulary of simplicity and surrender. Civil rights pioneers A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin learned reticence and the logic of self-discipline, the need to distrust oneself even while waging a noble crusade.

Blending psychology, politics, spirituality, and confessional, The Road to Character provides an opportunity for us to rethink our priorities, and strive to build rich inner lives marked by humility and moral depth.

“Joy,” David Brooks writes, “is a byproduct experienced by people who are aiming for something else. But it comes.”

Praise for The Road to Character

“A hyper-readable, lucid, often richly detailed human story.”—The New York Times Book Review

“David Brooks—the New York Times columnist and PBS commentator whose measured calm gives punditry a good name—offers the building blocks of a meaningful life.”—Washingtonian

“This profound and eloquent book is written with moral urgency and philosophical elegance.”—Andrew Solomon, author of Far from the Tree and The Noonday Demon

“The voice of the book is calm, fair and humane. The highlight of the material is the quality of the author’s moral and spiritual judgments.”—The Washington Post

“A powerful, haunting book that works its way beneath your skin.”—The Guardian (U.K.)

“This learned and engaging book brims with pleasures.”—Newsday

“Original and eye-opening . . . At his best, Brooks is a normative version of Malcolm Gladwell, culling from a wide array of scientists and thinkers to weave an idea bigger than the sum of its parts.”—USA Today

“There is something affecting in the diligence with which Brooks seeks a cure for his self-diagnosed shallowness by plumbing the depths of others.”—Rebecca Mead, The New Yorker


From the Hardcover edition.
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