The post-captain; or, The wooden walls well manned [by J. Davis].

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Published on
Dec 31, 1815
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Pages
250
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Language
English
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John Davis
The 14 chapters in Ethics at the End of Life: New Issues and Arguments, all published here for the first time, focus on recent thinking in this important area, helping initiate issues and lines of argument that have not been explored previously.? At the same time, a reader can use this volume to become oriented to the established questions and positions in end of life ethics, both because new questions are set in their context, and because most of the chapters—written by a team of experts—survey the field as well as add to it. ?Each chapter includes initial summaries, final conclusions, and a Related Topics section.? ?

TABLE OF CONTENTS

John K. Davis, ?"Introduction"

Geoffrey Scarre, "Is it possible to be better off dead?"

Taylor W. Cyr, "How Does Death Harm the Deceased?"

Benjamin Mitchell-Yellin, "The Significance of an Afterlife"

Jens Johansson, "The Severity of Death"

John K. Davis, "Defining Death"

James Stacey Taylor, "Autonomy, Competence, and End of Life"

Eric Vogelstein, "Deciding for the Incompetent"

Paul T. Menzel, "Change of Mind: An Issue for Advance Directives"

Nancy S. Jecker, "Medical Futility and Respect for Patient Autonomy"

Paul T. Menzel, "Refusing Lifesaving Medical Treatment and Food and Water by Mouth"

Thomas S. Huddle, "Suicide, Physician-Assisted Suicide, the Doing-Allowing Distinction and Double Effect"

Michael Cholbi, "Grief and End of Life Surrogate Decision-making"

Bruce Jennings, "Solidarity near the End of Life: The Promise of Relational Decision-making in the Care of the Dying"

Colin Farrelly, "Justice and the Aging of the Human Species"

John Davis Billings
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 Excerpt: ...unmindful that they must first go to school and learn the art of war from its very beginnings, and right at that point their sorrows began. I think the greatest cross they bore consisted in being compelled to settle down in home camp, as some regiments did for months, waiting to be sent off. Here they were in sight of home in many cases, yet outside of its comforts to a large extent; soldiers, yet out of danger; bidding their friends a tender adieu to-day, because they are to leave them--perhaps forever--to-morrow. But the morrow comes, and finds them still in camp. Yes, there were soldiers who bade their friends a long good-by in the morning, and started for camp expecting that very noon or afternoon to leave for the tented field, but who at night returned again to spend a few hours more at the homestead, as the departure of the regiment had been unexpectedly deferred. The soldiers underwent a great deal of wear and tear from false alarms of this kind, owing to various reasons. Sometimes the regiment failed to depart because it was not full; sometimes it was awaiting its field officers; sometimes complete equipments were not to be had; sometimes it was delayed to join an expedition not yet ready; and thus, in one way or other, the men and their friends were kept long on the tiptoe of expectation. Whenever a rumor became prevalent that the regiment was surely going to leave on a certain day near at hand, straightway there was an exodus from camp for home, some obtaining a furlough, but more going without one, to take another touching leave all around, for the dozenth time perhaps. Many of those who lived too far away to be sure of returning in time, remained in camp, and telegraphed friends to meet them at some large centre, as they passed through on the sp...
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