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Publisher
P. F. Collier & son
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Published on
Dec 31, 1909
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Pages
444
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Language
English
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This content is DRM free.
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Book 17
Dominating the literary life of Restoration England, Dryden produced a large oeuvre of poetry, plays, essays and translations that were without their equal, inspiring later critics to refer to his era simply as the 'Age of Dryden'. The Delphi Poets Series offers readers the works of literature's finest poets, with superior formatting. This volume presents the complete poetical works and plays of John Dryden for the first time in digital publishing history, with beautiful illustrations and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 2)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Dryden's life and works
* Concise introductions to the poetry and other works
* Excellent formatting of the poems, with line numbers, ideal for students
* Special chronological and alphabetical contents tables for the poetry
* Easily locate the poems you want to read
* Includes Dryden's complete 28 plays and operas - spend hours exploring the poet's dramatic works
* Features no less than four biographies, including Sir Walter Scott's seminal study - discover Dryden's literary life
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

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CONTENTS:

The Poetry Collections
EARLY POEMS
ANNUS MIRABILIS
MAC FLECKNOE
ABSALOM AND ACHITOPHEL
THE MEDALL
RELIGIO LAICI
THE HIND AND THE PANTHER
EPISTLES AND COMPLIMENTARY ADDRESSES
ELEGIES AND EPITAPHS
SONGS, ODES AND LYRICAL PIECES
FABLES ANCIENT AND MODERN
POETRY FROM THE PLAYS
TRANSLATIONS

The Poems
LIST OF POEMS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER
LIST OF POEMS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

The Plays
THE WILD GALLANT
THE RIVAL LADIES
THE INDIAN QUEEN
THE INDIAN EMPEROR
SECRET-LOVE
SIR MARTIN MAR-ALL
THE TEMPEST
TYRANNICK LOVE
AN EVENING'S LOVE
ALMANZOR AND ALMAHIDE
MARRIAGE ¿ LA MODE
THE ASSIGNATION
AMBOYNA
AURENG-ZEBE
THE STATE OF INNOCENCE AND FALL OF MAN
ALL FOR LOVE
OEDIPUS
TROILUS AND CRESSIDA
LIMBERHAM
THE SPANISH FRYAR
THE DUKE OF GUISE
ALBION AND ALBANIUS
DON SEBASTIAN, KING OF PORTUGAL
AMPHITRYON
KING ARTHUR
CLEOMENES, THE SPARTAN HERO
LOVE TRIUMPHANT
CONTRIBUTIONS TO VANBRUGH'S ADAPTATION OF FLETCHER'S THE PILGRIM

The Non-Fiction
ESSAY OF DRAMATIC POESY
HIS MAJESTIES DECLARATION DEFENDED
PLUTARCH'S LIVES

The Biographies
THE LIFE OF JOHN DRYDEN by Sir Walter Scott
LIVES OF THE POETS: DRYDEN by Samuel Johnson
THE AGE OF DRYDEN by Richard Garnett
BRIEF LIFE OF JOHN DRYDEN by George Gilfillan

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Percy Bysshe Shelley
 This edition of his "Poetical Works" contains all Shelley's ascertained poems and fragments of verse that have hitherto appeared in print. In preparing the volume I have worked as far as possible on the principle of recognizing the editio princeps as the primary textual authority. I have not been content to reprint Mrs. Shelley's recension of 1839, or that of any subsequent editor of the "Poems". The present text is the result of a fresh collation of the early editions; and in every material instance of departure from the wording of those originals the rejected reading has been subjoined in a footnote. Again, wherever—as in the case of "Julian and Maddalo"—there has appeared to be good reason for superseding the authority of the editio princeps, the fact is announced, and the substituted exemplar indicated, in the Prefatory Note. in the case of a few pieces extant in two or more versions of debatable authority the alternative text or texts will be found at the [end] of the [relevant work]; but it may be said once for all that this does not pretend to be a variorum edition, in the proper sense of the term—the textual apparatus does not claim to be exhaustive. Thus I have not thought it necessary to cumber the footnotes with every minute grammatical correction introduced by Mrs. Shelley, apparently on her own authority, into the texts of 1839; nor has it come within the scheme of this edition to record every conjectural emendation adopted or proposed by Rossetti and others in recent times. But it is hoped that, up to and including the editions of 1839 at least, no important variation of the text has been overlooked. Whenever a reading has been adopted on manuscript authority, a reference to the particular source has been added below.

I have been chary of gratuitous interference with the punctuation of the manuscripts and early editions; in this direction, however, some revision was indispensable. Even in his most carefully finished "fair copy" Shelley under-punctuates (Thus in the exquisite autograph "Hunt MS." of "Julian and Maddalo", Mr. Buxton Forman, the most conservative of editors, finds it necessary to supplement Shelley's punctuation in no fewer than ninety-four places.), and sometimes punctuates capriciously. In the very act of transcribing his mind was apt to stray from the work in hand to higher things; he would lose himself in contemplating those airy abstractions and lofty visions of which alone he greatly cared to sing, to the neglect and detriment of the merely external and formal element of his song. Shelley recked little of the jots and tittles of literary craftsmanship; he committed many a small sin against the rules of grammar, and certainly paid but a halting attention to the nice distinctions of punctuation. Thus in the early editions a comma occasionally plays the part of a semicolon; colons and semicolons seem to be employed interchangeably; a semicolon almost invariably appears where nowadays we should employ the dash; and, lastly, the dash itself becomes a point of all work, replacing indifferently commas, colons, semicolons or periods. Inadequate and sometimes haphazard as it is, however, Shelley's punctuation, so far as it goes, is of great value as an index to his metrical, or at times, it may be, to his rhetorical intention—for, in Shelley's hands, punctuation serves rather to mark the rhythmical pause and onflow of the verse, or to secure some declamatory effect, than to indicate the structure or elucidate the sense. For this reason the original pointing has been retained, save where it tends to obscure or pervert the poet's meaning. Amongst the Editor's Notes at the end of the Volume 3 the reader will find lists of the punctual variations in the longer poems, by means of which the supplementary points now added may be identified, and the original points, which in this edition have been deleted or else replaced by others, ascertained, in the order of their occurrence. In the use of capitals Shelley's practice has been followed, while an attempt has been made to reduce the number of his inconsistencies in this regard.
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