Marxian Economics

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This is an excerpt, concentrating on Marxian economics, from the 4-volume dictionary of economics, a reference book which aims to define the subject of economics today. 1300 subject entries in the complete work cover the broad themes of economic theory.
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Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Feb 23, 1990
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Pages
383
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ISBN
9781349205721
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Economics / General
Business & Economics / Economics / Theory
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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