An essay on the different nature of accent and quantity: with their use and application in the English, Latin, and Greek languages: containing remarks on the metre of the English; on the origin and aeolism of the Roman; on the general history of the Greek; with an account of its ancient tones, and a defense of their present accentual marks. With some additions from the papers of Dr. Taylor and Mr. Markland. To which is subjoined, the Greek elegiac poem of M. Musurus, addressed to Leo X, with a Latin version and notes

Printed by J.F. Dove for R. Priestley
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Printed by J.F. Dove for R. Priestley
Read more
Published on
Dec 31, 1820
Read more
Pages
388
Read more
Read more
Best For
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
English language
Foreign Language Study / Ancient Languages
Foreign Language Study / Latin
Greek language
Latin language
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Earn-lay atin-Lay? No, not that kind of Latin! You can learn true Latin, with conjugations, declensions, and all those extra syllables – and it’s easier than you think. In fact, most people mistakenly think of learning Latin as perhaps the most useless, tedious, and difficult thing to do on earth. They couldn’t be more wrong.

Latin For Dummies takes you back for a quick jaunt through the parlance of ancient Rome, as well as discussing the progress of Latin into church language, and its status today as the “dead” language that lives on in English, Spanish, Italian, and most other Western tongues. Written for those with zero prior knowledge of Latin, this snappy guide puts the basics at your fingertips and steers clear of the arcane, schoolmarm stereotype of endless declensions and Herculean translations. Easy-to-understand sections describe:

Latin you already know Grammar Pronunciation Latin in action Latin in law Latin in medicine Latin for impressing your friends And much more

No dusty tome or other such artifact, Latin For Dummies makes learning fun and brings the language to life by presenting conversations in various Roman settings, as well as providing fun facts and stories about classical life. And if you feel you may actually have a negative aptitude for the language, don’t worry; pronunciations and translations follow every expression, and a helpful mini-dictionary graces the book’s last pages. You’ll also find out about:

The quotable Roman Latin graffiti Latin authors who’s who Gladiator Latin Latin in love, marriage, and family From the mouth of Julius Caesar Romans on drink Helpful Latin-related Web sites Fun and games exercises

Designed to introduce and familiarize you with the language rather than make you the next Cicero, Latin For Dummies gives you all the tools you need to work at your own pace to learn as much or as little as you like. So noli timere (no-lee tih-may-reh) – “have no fear” – and carpe diem (“pick up Latin For Dummies today”)!

Let’s Write offers a wealth of suggestions for approaches to developing primary school pupils’ writing skills that will capture the children’s interest, while enabling them to improve their ability to express themselves in writing. It aims to meet the requirements of the new national curriculum for English at KS2 in a way that will develop the children’s standard of writing by presenting activities that they will find enjoyable and stimulating.

Throughout the book, the emphasis is on providing activities that will engage the pupils in a discussion of how texts are structured, before producing their own writing. John Foster suggests a range of imaginative tasks that both literacy specialists and non-specialists will find useful in developing children’ ability to write coherently and correctly.

Let’s Write includes:

a clear explanation of the writing process with activities designed to improve pupils’ drafting skills

examples of the different types of writing for pupils to analyse, which they can use as models for their own writing

a range of imaginative ideas for writing tasks, together with suggestions of curriculum opportunities for practising particular forms

writing challenges which can be used to stretch more able writers and thus to introduce differentiation by task, as well as by outcome

writing tips, for example, on sentence structure and paragraph structure, appropriate to the different types of writing

activities involving pupils in the assessment of their writing

a section on writing correctly, focussing on grammar, spelling and punctuation

a section containing games and activities designed to extend pupils’ vocabulary.

Let’s Write provides teachers with a lively collection of resources that will be welcomed by teachers and that will help to develop children’s writing.

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.