Luda; a lay of the Druids. Hymns, tales, essays, and legends

Hamilton, Adams and Co.
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Publisher
Hamilton, Adams and Co.
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Published on
Dec 31, 1868
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Pages
272
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Language
English
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This content is DRM free.
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Stirringly told from the view of everyday soldiers, Covenant with Death is acclaimed as one of the greatest novels about war ever written. With a new foreword by Louis de Bernières, author of Captain Corelli's Mandolin.

They joined for their country. They fought for each other.

When war breaks out in 1914, Mark Fenner and his Sheffield friends immediately flock to Kitchener's call. Amid waving flags and boozy celebration, the three men - Fen, his best friend Locky and self-assured Frank, rival for the woman Fen loves - enlist as volunteers to take on the Germans and win glory.

Through ramshackle training in sodden England and a stint in arid Egypt, rebellious but brave Fen proves himself to be a natural leader, only undermined by on-going friction with Frank. Headed by terse, tough Sergeant Major Bold, this group of young men form steel-strong bonds, and yearn to face the great adventure of the Western Front.

Then, on one summer's day in 1916, Fen and his band of brothers are sent to the Somme, and this very ordinary hero discovers what it means to fight for your life.

'Laden with knowledge yet sparely written, Covenant with Death is the work of an author immersed in the lives of those who fought'
The Times

'The last line ought to be carved in stone somewhere . . . Find it. Read it. You'll be a better person for having done so'
Peter Hitchens, Daily Mail

An anti-war book right up there with Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front
Shortlist (The Greatest War Novels of all Time)

'Covenant With Death . . . showed with unbearable actuality what happened to a newly formed Sheffield regiment on the first day of the battle of the Somme'
Christopher Hitchens, Guardian

'The blood and guts, the nightmare stink of cordite . . . appalling realism'
The Times

'Only one novel about the war since 1945 has the power and feeling of veracity to compare with the works of the 1920s and 30s . . . Covenant with Death by John Harris'
The Western Front Organisation

'A superb novel'
Daily Mirror

'John Harris's neglected masterpiece of a novel, Covenant With Death, is the success that it is because it follows a group of Sheffield workers from their flag-waving sign-up to the hecatomb on the Somme'
The Atlantic

'True and terrible'
Observer

'An outstanding achievement'
Sunday Express

Decisive biotechnological interventions in the lottery of human life--to enhance our bodies and brains and perhaps irreversibly change our genetic makeup--have been widely rejected as unethical and undesirable, and have often met with extreme hostility. But in Enhancing Evolution, leading bioethicist John Harris dismantles objections to genetic engineering, stem-cell research, designer babies, and cloning to make a forthright, sweeping, and rigorous ethical case for using biotechnology to improve human life.

Human enhancement, Harris argues, is a good thing--good morally, good for individuals, good as social policy, and good for a genetic heritage that needs serious improvement. Enhancing Evolution defends biotechnological interventions that could allow us to live longer, healthier, and even happier lives by, for example, providing us with immunity from cancer and HIV/AIDS. But the book advocates far more than therapies designed to free us from sickness and disability. Harris champions the possibility of influencing the very course of evolution to give us increased mental and physical powers--from reasoning, concentration, and memory to strength, stamina, and reaction speed. Indeed, he supports enhancing ourselves in almost any way we desire. And it's not only morally defensible to enhance ourselves, Harris says. In some cases, it's morally obligatory.

Whether one looks upon biotechnology with hope, fear, or a little of both, Enhancing Evolution makes a case for it that no one can ignore.

Many people know about Howard Hughes, Americas first billionaire. He was an aviation engineer, an Oscar-winning motion picture producer and director, and a hotel and casino owner in Las Vegas and Reno, with seven establishments. He built the biggest airplane in the world at the timeknown as the Spruce Gooseand the Glormar Explorer supership for the CIA. He owned RKO Motion Picture Studios in Hollywood, as well as tens of thousands of acres in California, Nevada, and Texas.

Fewer people, however, know the Howard Hughes of the neon world of Las Vegas in the 1970s. Reclusive and eccentric, Hughes spent his later years surrounded by Mormon aides who insulated him from outsiders. This collection of biographical anecdotes includes stories of the power players of the timecelebrities, famous actresses, and the Las Vegas Mafiaas well as tales of Hughess bevy of less-well-known ladies.

Told by an insider who knew Hughes in that era, these stories reveal new aspects of an American icon, set against the background of Sin City, the town he loved so much.

John has captured a fascinating era here; I know I was there.
Alvin Zuckert, Emmy-award winning television director

Johns book caused me to relive an exciting and wonderful time in my life. There were sides of Hughes you never knew existed until now!
Ted West, engineer for Hughes Television, KLAS-TV and FOX-TV, Las Vegas, Nevada

No crapshoot here; Johns got an absolute winner.
Gary Marlow, technical director for Hughes Television, KLAS-TV, Las Vegas, Nevada

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