Guide to the Archival Materials of the German-speaking Emigration to the United States after 1933: Volume 3

Walter de Gruyter
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Publisher
Walter de Gruyter
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Published on
Feb 21, 2014
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Pages
991
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ISBN
9783110960631
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Modern / 20th Century
History / Social History
Science / General
Social Science / General
Social Science / Jewish Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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From the moment I got to Auschwitz I was completely detached. I disconnected my heart and intellect in an act of self-defense, despair, and hopelessness." With these words Sara Nomberg-Przytyk begins this painful and compelling account of her experiences while imprisoned for two years in the infamous death camp. Writing twenty years after her liberation, she recreates the events of a dark past which, in her own words, would have driven her mad had she tried to relive it sooner. But while she records unimaginable atrocities, she also richly describes the human compassion that stubbornly survived despite the backdrop of camp depersonalization and imminent extermination.

Commemorative in spirit and artistic in form, Auschwitz convincingly portrays the paradoxes of human nature in extreme circumstances. With consummate understatement Nomberg-Przytyk describes the behavior of concentration camp inmates as she relentlessly and pitilessly examines her own motives and feelings. In this world unmitigated cruelty coexisted with nobility, rapacity with self-sacrifice, indifference with selfless compassion. This book offers a chilling view of the human drama that existed in Auschwitz.

From her portraits of camp personalities, an extraordinary and horrifying profile emerges of Dr. Josef Mengele, whose medical experiments resulted in the slaughter of nearly half a million Jews. Nomberg-Przytyk's job as an attendant in Mengle's hospital allowed her to observe this Angel of Death firsthand and to provide us with the most complete description to date of his monstrous activities.

The original Polish manuscript was discovered by Eli Pfefferkorn in 1980 in the Yad Vashem Archive in Jerusalem. Not knowing the fate of the journal's author, Pfefferkorn spent two years searching and finally located Nomberg-Przytyk in Canada. Subsequent interviews revealed the history of the manuscript, the author's background, and brought the journal into perspective.

A New York Times Notable Book of 2016
Winner of the Zócalo Public Square Book Prize

On March 29, 1516, the city council of Venice issued a decree forcing Jews to live in il geto—a closed quarter named for the copper foundry that once occupied the area. The term stuck.

In this sweeping and original account, Mitchell Duneier traces the idea of the ghetto from its beginnings in the sixteenth century and its revival by the Nazis to the present. As Duneier shows, we cannot comprehend the entanglements of race, poverty, and place in America today without recalling the ghettos of Europe, as well as earlier efforts to understand the problems of the American city.

Ghetto is the story of the scholars and activists who tried to achieve that understanding. As Duneier shows, their efforts to wrestle with race and poverty cannot be divorced from their individual biographies, which often included direct encounters with prejudice and discrimination in the academy and elsewhere. Using new and forgotten sources, Duneier introduces us to Horace Cayton and St. Clair Drake, graduate students whose conception of the South Side of Chicago established a new paradigm for thinking about Northern racism and poverty in the 1940s. We learn how the psychologist Kenneth Clark subsequently linked Harlem’s slum conditions with the persistence of black powerlessness, and we follow the controversy over Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s report on the black family. We see how the sociologist William Julius Wilson redefined the debate about urban America as middle-class African Americans increasingly escaped the ghetto and the country retreated from racially specific remedies. And we trace the education reformer Geoffrey Canada’s efforts to transform the lives of inner-city children with ambitious interventions, even as other reformers sought to help families escape their neighborhoods altogether.

Duneier offers a clear-eyed assessment of the thinkers and doers who have shaped American ideas about urban poverty—and the ghetto. The result is a valuable new estimation of an age-old concept.

Deutschsprachige Exilliteratur seit 1933 provides an overview of German-speaking exile literature in the USA. Exiled authors are those German-speaking authors who emigrated during the Thirties due to political or ethnic reasons, resulting directly or indirectly from Hitler's taking power. Exile literature refers not to the works of former emigrants after their return, but to the literature written by emigrants during their exile. The series includes film, theatre and literary essays in addition to the belles-lettres. With the publishing of part-volume 3/V the series is now complete! Volume 1 and 2 focus mainly on emigrantion: Volume 1 - California covers individuals such as Thomas Mann, Lion Feuchtwanger und Bertolt Brecht as well as authors who worked for the film industry in Hollywood, like Billy Wilder. Volume 2 - New York is concerned with emigrants who went to New York, the arena for some of the most significant controversies regarding National Socialism and exile. Volume 3, published in five parts, present portraits of more than 80 literary figures. Volume 3/III to 3/V contains further portraits of authors along with articles dealing specifically with the problems of emigration and the conditions in which emigrants had to live. The current Volume 3/V offers a thoroughly revised and completed table 'Exiljahre in den USA' (years of exile in the USA), listing the exact details of the period spent in exile, by all those German-speaking authors listed in volume 5. Volume 4 contains, in three part volumes, a total of 225 personal bibliographies, of which 150 are first bibliographies.
Deutschsprachige Exilliteratur seit 1933 provides an overview of German-speaking exile literature in the USA. Exiled authors are those German-speaking authors who emigrated during the Thirties due to political or ethnic reasons, resulting directly or indirectly from Hitler's taking power. Exile literature refers not to the works of former emigrants after their return, but to the literature written by emigrants during their exile. The series includes film, theatre and literary essays in addition to the belles-lettres. With the publishing of part-volume 3/V the series is now complete! Volume 1 and 2 focus mainly on emigrantion: Volume 1 - California covers individuals such as Thomas Mann, Lion Feuchtwanger und Bertolt Brecht as well as authors who worked for the film industry in Hollywood, like Billy Wilder. Volume 2 - New York is concerned with emigrants who went to New York, the arena for some of the most significant controversies regarding National Socialism and exile. Volume 3, published in five parts, present portraits of more than 80 literary figures. Volume 3/III to 3/V contains further portraits of authors along with articles dealing specifically with the problems of emigration and the conditions in which emigrants had to live. The current Volume 3/V offers a thoroughly revised and completed table 'Exiljahre in den USA' (years of exile in the USA), listing the exact details of the period spent in exile, by all those German-speaking authors listed in volume 5. Volume 4 contains, in three part volumes, a total of 225 personal bibliographies, of which 150 are first bibliographies.
Deutschsprachige Exilliteratur seit 1933 provides an overview of German-speaking exile literature in the USA. Exiled authors are those German-speaking authors who emigrated during the Thirties due to political or ethnic reasons, resulting directly or indirectly from Hitler's taking power. Exile literature refers not to the works of former emigrants after their return, but to the literature written by emigrants during their exile. The series includes film, theatre and literary essays in addition to the belles-lettres. With the publishing of part-volume 3/V the series is now complete! Volume 1 and 2 focus mainly on emigrantion: Volume 1 - California covers individuals such as Thomas Mann, Lion Feuchtwanger und Bertolt Brecht as well as authors who worked for the film industry in Hollywood, like Billy Wilder. Volume 2 - New York is concerned with emigrants who went to New York, the arena for some of the most significant controversies regarding National Socialism and exile. Volume 3, published in five parts, present portraits of more than 80 literary figures. Volume 3/III to 3/V contains further portraits of authors along with articles dealing specifically with the problems of emigration and the conditions in which emigrants had to live. The current Volume 3/V offers a thoroughly revised and completed table 'Exiljahre in den USA' (years of exile in the USA), listing the exact details of the period spent in exile, by all those German-speaking authors listed in volume 5. Volume 4 contains, in three part volumes, a total of 225 personal bibliographies, of which 150 are first bibliographies.
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