Ruling Suburbia: John J. McClure and the Republican Machine in Delaware County, Pennsylvania

University of Delaware Press
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"Ruling Suburbia chronicles the history of the Republican machine that has dominated the political life of Delaware County, Pennsylvania, since 1875. The majority of the work is devoted to the career of John J. McClure, who controlled the machine from 1907 until 1965. The story of his career makes four central points. First, political machines were not confined to urban areas. Second, neither the New Deal, immigration restriction, nor the rise of organized labor destroyed all the old Republican machines. Third, contrary to the national trend, the black population in Delaware County continued throughout the century to support machine-sponsored Republicans for state, county, and municipal office. Finally, practical considerations such as jobs, school, parks, public transportation, trash removal, police, and fire protection have always been more important to the citizens of Delaware County than has been democratic government. By delivering those things, the machine has succeeded in maintaining its hegemony for over 100 years.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Delaware Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2003
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Pages
352
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ISBN
9780874138146
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / American Government / State
Political Science / Political Process / General
Political Science / Political Process / Political Parties
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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