Joyce's Finnegans Wake

Joyce's Finnegans Wake: The Curse of Kabbalah

Book 3
Universal-Publishers
1
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This third in a series continues this non-academic author's ground-breaking word by word analysis of James Joyce's Finnegans Wake, Joyce's last blessing on mankind. This volume covers chapters 1.5 and 1.6 with the intent to explore them as art objects, to examine how they work as art. By contrast with previous reduction-based chapters, Chapter 1.5 features expansion, One becoming Many. The spirit of the female principle registered in ALP's letter or "mamafesta" hatches the expansion. This chapter honors creativity in literature along with the human female instinct for giving birth to new human potential. An academically-oriented Professor explores but misses the meaning of the letter. Aristotle's concept of the infinite and the legend of Krishna injecting independence in Gopi milk women frame the chapter. Chapter 1.6 brings back the forces of reduction, Many becoming One. Instead of the female hatching the new, here the male spirit smothers new possibilities in favor of control. Shaun hijacks questions put by Shem to others and reduces their potentially different answers to his answer. The charming fable of Mookse and Gripes modeled on Aesop's "sour grapes" explores the schism between the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches; while arguing, both fail to notice the potential presence of the Holy Spirit. These two chapters feature two very different processes, the maternal process and the excremental process, the mother's womb in chapter 1.5 and the colon in chapter 1.6. The mother releases the new child and the colon the same old waste. Distorted spirit in the colon-inspired chapter sponsors Shaun sodomizing his sister. Joyce's masterful synergism of style and content continues. For example: Chapter 1.6 includes a second fable about Burrus [and Caseous], the name suggesting butter. The language used by Joyce takes on the characteristics of butter; like dependent humans, the words change shape and spread easily.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Universal-Publishers
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Published on
Dec 31, 2010
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Pages
366
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ISBN
9781599428581
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Criticism / European / English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Religion / Judaism / Kabbalah & Mysticism
Study Aids / Book Notes
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Fresh from the twilight zone of Kafka's The Metamorphosis, this non-academic author treats on a line by line basis two of Kafka's last stories, stories written while he was wheezing with tuberculosis. Not surprisingly, these stories features pipes, just what Kafka was thinking about all the time while he was bed ridden, his sore pipes. Kafka experienced the threat of death at the same time as he experienced the love of his life with Dora Diamant. In these two stories Kafka spot-lights fear and love, the most basic human issues and those that had taken possession of Kafka's life. Fear and love in the lives of a mole-like creature alone in a burrow and mice in a crowded colony. In stories with no humans, Kafka teaches us what is most important in being human.

The Burrow examines fear-based isolation of a mole-like creature living all alone in his underground burrow. The only connection with others is fear-based taking, taking by claws and teeth. You are either the diner or dinner, never a guest or host. You are alone but not independent because fear eats your life possibilities independence could give. You are your own worst enemy.

Josephine the Singer features love-based giving through art, Kafka's last word on the purpose of art. Like a loving parent giving to her child, the artist mouse Josephine attempts to inspire independent individuality in other mice in the colony through the example of her unique and spontaneous singing. This she gives free of charge. Because of fear of survival stoked by the colony leadership, the rest of the mouse collective hears her singing as a mouse but not as an individual. They remain in fear-based group think with reduced life possibilities.

In both stories, the issue is the effect of fear or love on independent individual identity and life possibilities. For Kafka, this was the uber human issue as he prepared to meet his maker.

 

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