Biological availability of pollutants to marine organisms

Environmental Protection Agency , Office of Research and Development, Environmental Research Laboratory
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Additional Information

Publisher
Environmental Protection Agency , Office of Research and Development, Environmental Research Laboratory
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Published on
Dec 31, 1978
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Pages
135
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Aquatic organisms
Marine animals
Marine pollution
Ocean outfalls
Science / Environmental Science
Sewage disposal in the ocean
Sewage sludge
Technology & Engineering / Environmental / General
Technology & Engineering / Environmental / Waste Management
Waste disposal in the ocean
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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