Molecular Biology of the Cell: The Problems Book, Sixth Edition

Garland Science
6
Free sample

The Problems Book helps students appreciate the ways in which experiments and simple calculations can lead to an understanding of how cells work by introducing the experimental foundation of cell and molecular biology. Each chapter reviews key terms, tests for understanding basic concepts, and poses research-based problems.The Problems Book has been designed to correspond with the first twenty chapters of Molecular Biology of the Cell, Sixth Edition.
Read more

About the author

John Wilson was born in 1943 in London. He is a British angler who has been involved with angling television production for the last 20 years. He is featured on Discovery Real Time and was voted 'The Greatest Angler of all Time' in a 2004 poll by readers of the Angling Times Newspaper. Wilson was awarded a MBE in the 2009 Queen's Birthday Honours List. His book titles include Another Fishing Year, John Wilson's 1001 Top Angling Tips, Sixty years a Fisherman, and Catch Carp and Tench with John Wilson. His book New Zealand Mountaineering: A History in Photographs made the New Zealand Best Seller List in 2015.

Read more
4.2
6 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Garland Science
Read more
Published on
Nov 21, 2014
Read more
Pages
984
Read more
ISBN
9781317497271
Read more
Read more
Best For
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Science / Life Sciences / Molecular Biology
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
In which a scientist searches for an empirical explanation for phenomenal experience, spurred by his instinctual belief that life is meaningful.

What links conscious experience of pain, joy, color, and smell to bioelectrical activity in the brain? How can anything physical give rise to nonphysical, subjective, conscious states? Christof Koch has devoted much of his career to bridging the seemingly unbridgeable gap between the physics of the brain and phenomenal experience. This engaging book—part scientific overview, part memoir, part futurist speculation—describes Koch's search for an empirical explanation for consciousness. Koch recounts not only the birth of the modern science of consciousness but also the subterranean motivation for his quest—his instinctual (if "romantic") belief that life is meaningful.

Koch describes his own groundbreaking work with Francis Crick in the 1990s and 2000s and the gradual emergence of consciousness (once considered a "fringy" subject) as a legitimate topic for scientific investigation. Present at this paradigm shift were Koch and a handful of colleagues, including Ned Block, David Chalmers, Stanislas Dehaene, Giulio Tononi, Wolf Singer, and others. Aiding and abetting it were new techniques to listen in on the activity of individual nerve cells, clinical studies, and brain-imaging technologies that allowed safe and noninvasive study of the human brain in action.

Koch gives us stories from the front lines of modern research into the neurobiology of consciousness as well as his own reflections on a variety of topics, including the distinction between attention and awareness, the unconscious, how neurons respond to Homer Simpson, the physics and biology of free will, dogs, Der Ring des Nibelungen, sentient machines, the loss of his belief in a personal God, and sadness. All of them are signposts in the pursuit of his life's work—to uncover the roots of consciousness.

WHAT IS A GREAT CEO?

Great CEOs are able to achieve success in their personal, family, and business lives. They are able to create an inspiring vision for their company, and effectively communicate that vision across their organization. They know themselves, and understand the motives and competencies of those around them. They are accountable, and know how to foster an environment of accountability. They realize the value of building and keeping a great team. They understand the numbers and can see well beyond the horizon. They get results. They are life-long learners. They are committed to continuous personal growth and understand that they can’t do it alone. They realize that faster growth and greater success come from learning

from others who have walked a similar path.

In Great CEOs and How They Are Made, successful entrepreneur, experienced business leader and top CEO mentor, John Wilson shares the knowledge gained and lessons learned from over 40 years working with some of the world’s great business leaders.

Implementing the lessons and tools shared in the Seven Imperatives will help you to:

• generate and communicate an inspiring vision

• find and keep the A players

• build and lead strong, functional teams

• become more accountable, and foster an environment of accountability

• better understand yourself and others

• use the best information to make quality decisions

• identify and create your perfect work-life balance

• dramatically improve your company’s performance

• Learn, grow, succeed, and become Great!

Now a classic, Kerouac’s Crooked Road was one of the first critical works on the legendary Beat writer to analyze his work as serious literary art, placing it in the broader American literary tradition with canonical writers like Herman Melville and Mark Twain. Author Tim Hunt explores Kerouac’s creative process and puts his work in conversation with classic American literature and with critical theory.

This edition includes a new preface by the author, which takes a discerning look at the implications of the 2007 publication of the original typewriter scroll version of On the Road for the understanding of Kerouac and his novel. Although some critics see the scroll version of the novel as embodying Kerouac’s true artistic vision and the 1957 Viking edition as a commercialized compromise of that vision, Hunt argues that the two versions should not be viewed as antithetical but rather as discrete perspectives of a writer deeply immersed in writing as both performance and evolving process.

Hunt moves beyond the mythos surrounding the “spontaneous creation” of On the Road, which upholds Kerouac’s reputation as a cultural icon, to look more closely at an innovative writer who wanted to bridge the gap between the luscious, talk-filled world of real life and the sterilized version of that world circumscribed by overly intellectualized, literary texts, through the use of written language driven by effusive passion rather than sober reflection. With close, erudite readings of Kerouac’s major and minor works, from On the Road to Visions of Cody,Hunt draws on Kerouac’s letters, novels, poetry, and experimental drafts to position Kerouac in both historical and literary contexts, emphasizing the influence of writers such as Emerson, Melville, Wolfe, and Hemingway on his provocative work.

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.