Zapata and the Mexican Revolution

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This essential volume recalls the activities of Emiliano Zapata (1879-1919), a leading figure in the Mexican Revolution; he formed and commanded an important revolutionary force during this conflict. Womack focuses attention on Zapata's activities and his home state of Morelos during the Revolution. Zapata quickly rose from his position as a peasant leader in a village seeking agrarian reform. Zapata's dedication to the cause of land rights made him a hero to the people. Womack describes the contributing factors and conditions preceding the Mexican Revolution, creating a narrative that examines political and agrarian transformations on local and national levels.
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About the author

John Womack, Jr., was born in 1937 in Norman, Oklahoma. He attended Harvard University, where he was a Phi Beta Kappa and graduated summa cum laudein 1959. He was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford from 1959-1961, then returned to Harvard and received his Ph.D. in history in 1965. Mr. Womack is the Robert Woods Bliss Professor of Latin American History and Economics, Emeritus, at Harvard University.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Vintage
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Published on
Jul 27, 2011
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Pages
480
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ISBN
9780307803320
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Social Activists
History / Latin America / Mexico
History / Revolutionary
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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The Mexico Reader is a vivid introduction to muchos Méxicos—the many Mexicos, or the many varied histories and cultures that comprise contemporary Mexico. Unparalleled in scope and written for the traveler, student, and expert alike, the collection offers a comprehensive guide to the history and culture of Mexico—including its difficult, uneven modernization; the ways the country has been profoundly shaped not only by Mexicans but also by those outside its borders; and the extraordinary economic, political, and ideological power of the Roman Catholic Church. The book looks at what underlies the chronic instability, violence, and economic turmoil that have characterized periods of Mexico’s history while it also celebrates the country’s rich cultural heritage.

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A gripping tale of personal revolution by a man who went from Crips co-founder to Nobel Peace Prize nominee, author, and antigang activist

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With a New Foreword

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North Korea’s political prison camps have existed twice as long as Stalin’s Soviet gulags and twelve times as long as the Nazi concentration camps. No one born and raised in these camps is known to have escaped. No one, that is, except Shin Dong-hyuk.

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