Timespace: Geographies of Temporality

Routledge
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Timespace undermines the old certainties of time and space by arguing that these dimensions do not exist singly, but only as a hybrid process term. The issue of space has perhaps been over-emphasised and it is essential that processes of everyday existence, such as globalisation and environmental issues and also notions such as gender, race and ethnicity, are looked at with a balanced time-space analysis.
The social and cultural consequences of this move are traced through a series of studies which deploy different perspectives - structural, phenomenological and even Buddhist - in order to make things meet up. The contributors provide an overview of the history of time and introduce the concepts of time and space together, across a range of disciplines. The themes discussed are of importance for cultural geography, sociology, anthropology, cultural and media studies, and psychology.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Aug 29, 2003
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Pages
336
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ISBN
9781134677849
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Earth Sciences / Geography
Social Science / Human Geography
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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