Atrial Fibrillation after Cardiac Surgery

Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine

Book 222
Springer Science & Business Media
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Cardiac surgery is performed on hundreds of thousands of patients a year, and can have an important beneficial impact on the outcomes of patients with coronary and valvular heart diseases. Despite the favorable recovery of most patients, some will have their post-operative period interrupted by the development of atrial fibrillation, with a host of potential complications including stroke. High risk subgroups may develop atrial fibrillation in more than half of cases, and often despite aggressive prophylactic measures. Treatment of atrial fibrillation and its aftermath can also add days to the hospital stay of the cardiac surgical patient. In an era of aggressive cost cutting and optimization of utilization of health care resources, the financial impact of this arrhythmic complication may be enormous.
Experimental studies have led to a greater understanding of the mechanism of atrial fibrillation and potential precipitating factors in the cardiac surgical patient. Prophylactic efforts with beta-blockers, antiarrhythmic drugs and atrial pacing are being used, or are being investigated in clinical trials. New methods of achieving prompt cardioversion with minimal disruption of patient care, and prevention of the thromboembolic complications of atrial fibrillation, are also important therapeutic initiatives. This text is designed to aid health care professionals in the treatment of their patients in the recovery period after cardiac surgery, and to instigate additional research efforts to limit the occurrence of, and the complications following, this tenacious postoperative arrhythmia.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Aug 28, 2007
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Pages
169
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ISBN
9780585280073
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Cardiology
Medical / Clinical Medicine
Medical / Surgery / Thoracic
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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This Symposium is the third of a series of scientific meetings in the field of echocardiology, held at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. * The series was initiated by Klaas Born, who organized the first two meetings with great success. These followed the procedure of two days of parallel sessions with invited speakers only. This time, we decided to broaden the basis of the meeting and have a three-day program of parallel sessions, combining invited papers, free com munications and posters. We decided, however, to maintain one of the most striking features of the last meeting- having the complete proceedings available at the time of the meeting. We confronted the authors-to-be with a very tight schedule in order to make the book a true reflection of the state of the art in echocardiology. As a 'result, editing time was also very limited and neither terminology nor units have been completely standardized. This book has three main parts. The first, and largest, part consists of contributions on echocardiology in adults, and is divided into four sections. The first section is a general survey of various applications, whereas the remaining three centre round specific applications, i.e. ischemic disease, left ventricular function and cardiac valves, respectively. The second part con tains applications in pediatric cardiology; due to the wide variety of topics covered, no particular subdivision has been made. The last part of the book is devoted to instrumentation, methods and new developments.
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