The 'Russian' Civil Wars, 1916-1926: Ten Years That Shook the World

Oxford University Press
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This volume offers a comprehensive and original analysis and reconceptualisation of the compendium of struggles that wracked the collapsing Tsarist empire and the emergent USSR, profoundly affecting the history of the twentieth century. Indeed, the reverberations of those decade-long wars echo to the present day - not despite, but because of the collapse of the Soviet Union, which re-opened many old wounds, from the Baltic to the Caucasus. Contemporary memorialising and 'de-memorialising' of these wars, therefore form part of the book's focus, but at its heart lie the struggles between various Russian political and military forces which sought to inherit and preserve, or even expand, the territory of the tsars, overlain with examinations of the attempts of many non-Russian national and religious groups to divide the former empire. The reasons why some of the latter were successful (Poland and Finland, for example), while others (Ukraine, Georgia and the Muslim Basmachi) were not, are as much the author's concern as are explanations as to why the chief victors of the 'Russian' Civil Wars were the Bolsheviks. Tellingly, the work begins and ends with battles in Central Asia - a theatre of the 'Russian' Civil Wars that was closer to Mumbai than it was to Moscow.
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About the author

Jonathan Smele teaches Russian and European history at Queen Mary, University of London and has published extensively on the Russian revolutions and civil wars. For a decade, he was editor of the journal Revolutionary Russia. His most recent work is the two-volume Historical Dictionary of the 'Russian' Civil Wars, 1916-1926.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Oxford University Press
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Published on
Jan 15, 2016
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Pages
464
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ISBN
9780190613495
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Revolutionary
History / Russia & the Former Soviet Union
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This content is DRM protected.
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Drawing on scores of previously untapped files from Russian archives and a range of other repositories in Europe, Turkey, and the United States, McMeekin delivers exciting, groundbreaking research about this turbulent era. The first comprehensive history of these momentous events in two decades, The Russian Revolution combines cutting-edge scholarship and a fast-paced narrative to shed new light on one of the most significant turning points of the twentieth century.

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