Garcilaso Inca de la Vega: An American Humanist, A Tribute to José Durand

University of Notre Dame Pess
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Widely read and translated, Garcilaso is a key figure for understanding the development of mestizo culture in Latin America and his works have sparked many heated debates. This new collection of articles advances that discussion through contributions by twelve distinguished scholars who review central aspects of Garcilaso's life and work from the perspectives of history, linguistics, literary theory, and anthropology. These essays explore the complex intertextual threads which weave through Garcilaso's principal writings. Some examine the relationship of his work with the canon of European historiography, while others stress its link with Andean culture; still others focus on the puzzles presented by his use of self-representation. Many of the articles offer fresh readings of Garcilaso's Royal Commentaries and include not only textual analyses of key themes but also a reassessment of Inca political organization. Other contributions address his Florida of the Inca, focusing on such aspects as its discourse and dating. Together, all the essays demonstrate that Garcilaso scholarship continues to be receptive to new critical approaches.
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About the author

José Anadón is a Professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at the University of Notre Dame.

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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Notre Dame Pess
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Published on
May 22, 1998
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Pages
264
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ISBN
9780268045531
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Historiography
History / Latin America / General
History / Latin America / South America
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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