Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Old Mother Hubbard (Illustrated)

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The book contains the classic tale of Goldilocks and the Three Bears, and the nursery rhyme, Old Mother Hubbard, illustrated throughout by Walter Crane (20 color drawings).
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3.7
46 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
The Planet
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Pages
35
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ISBN
9781909115682
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Language
English
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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My book, The Return of The Little Prince, is a sequel to the marvelous and whimsical story of my uncle Antoine De Saint-Exupery, The Little Prince, where myth and poetry mix with reality and speak to us of the eternal in such an innocent manner. Both his story and mine are true. They are real stories of a quest to find that invisible spark of life which gives meaning to all there is.

I learned the story from within, it was my aunt Consuelo De Saint-Exupery, an extraordinary person and the inspiration of Saint-Ex, the Rose of his story, who taught me to read, not only French in The Little Prince, but the essence of it as well. She talked to me about Saint-Ex, his dream world, of his airplane flights, of his moonstruck reveries, his airplane falls and the spirit that helped him survive them! Everything in that book was an integral part of what later happened to me and helped me to find that secret that now illumines my life.

I remember. . . when I was a little girl, maybe six years old, I learned to read. . . know. . . and love the Little Prince. Later on, I learned that many others also did; it was, I believe, the bedside book of James Dean. I never knew him personally, but I read in an interview of a movie magazine that he said The Little Prince was his Bible. . . and I wondered if what drew him to it was the same thing that I loved about it? What I loved best was the invisible hidden in between such simple words and its childlike drawings, for concealed behind the fairytale there was a road map to a true spiritual experience.

Whenever I read the last page of my uncle's book, I was moved by his sadness and felt a sense of urgency within me to find that lonely star landscape. So, I promised myself that one day I would find the Little Prince and let Saint-Ex know that he was back. Consequently, since early in life, I learned to close my eyes, open my heart and. . . began my quest. This tale is the fruit of my search. It has a happy ending as all good fairy tales have, for it happened that one day. . . when I least expected it. . . I found the Little Prince!

Thus, I wrote this book, both as a direct answer to my uncle's plea, to share the good news with all those who love The Little Prince and as an invitation to quest to all those who long to find their reality.

I have followed the same format of my uncle's book and also utilized the same style of drawings, wrapping my own story of how I searched and found the Little Prince with as much similarity as possible to that of his book, for a very good reason: I couldn't have done it in any other way, for I have loved The Little Prince since I was a child. My reason has been one of love, not arrogance, so please exempt me from the harshness of comparison if you are inclined to do so.

Ever since almost exactly a hundred years ago the Grimms produced their Fairy Tale Book, folk-lorists have been engaged in making similar collections for all the other countries of Europe, outside Germany, till there is scarcely a nook or a corner in the whole continent that has not been ransacked for these products of the popular fancy. The Grimms themselves and most of their followers have pointed out the similarity or, one might even say, the identity of plot and incident of many of these tales throughout the European Folk-Lore field. Von Hahn, when collecting the Greek and Albanian Fairy Tales in 1864, brought together these common formul of the European Folk-Tale. These were supplemented by Mr. S. Baring-Gould in 1868, and I myself in 1892 contributed an even fuller list to the Hand Book of Folk-Lore. Most, if not all of these formul, have been found in all the countries of Europe where folk-tales have been collected. In 1893 Miss M. Roalfe Cox brought together, in a volume of the Folk-Lore Society, no less than 345 variants of Cinderella and kindred stories showing how widespread this particular formula was throughout Europe and how substantially identical the various incidents as reproduced in each particular country.
It has occurred to me that it would be of great interest and, for folk-lore purposes, of no little importance, to bring together these common Folk-Tales of Europe, retold in such a way as to bring out the original form from which all the variants were derived. I am, of course, aware of the difficulty and hazardous nature of such a proceeding; yet it is fundamentally the same as that by which scholars are accustomed to restore the Ur-text from the variants of different families of MSS. and still more similar to the process by which Higher Critics attempt to restore the original narratives of Holy Writ. Every one who has had to tell fairy tales to children will appreciate the conservative tendencies of the child mind; every time you vary an incident the children will cry out, That was not the way you told us before.? The Folk-Tale collections can therefore be assumed to retain the original readings with as much fidelity as most MSS. That there was such an original rendering eminating from a single folk artist no serious student of Miss Cox's volume can well doubt. When one finds practically the same ?tags? of verse in such different dialects as Danish and Romaic, German and Italian, one cannot imagine that these sprang up independently in Denmark, Greece, Germany, and Florence. The same phenomenon is shown in another field of Folk-Lore where, as the late Mr. Newell showed, the same rhymes are used to brighten up the same children?s games in Barcelona and in Boston; one cannot imagine them springing up independently in both places. So, too, when the same incidents of a fairy tale follow in the same artistic concatenation in Scotland, and in Sicily, in Brittany, and in Albania, one cannot but assume that the original form of the story was hit upon by one definite literary artist among the folk. What I have attempted to do in this book is to restore the original form, which by a sort of international selection has spread throughout all the European folks.
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