Statistical Optics: Edition 2

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This book discusses statistical methods that are useful for treating problems in modern optics, and the application of these methods to solving a variety of such problems

This book covers a variety of statistical problems in optics, including both theory and applications. The text covers the necessary background in statistics, statistical properties of light waves of various types, the theory of partial coherence and its applications, imaging with partially coherent light, atmospheric degradations of images, and noise limitations in the detection of light. New topics have been introduced in the second edition, including:

  • Analysis of the Vander Pol oscillator model of laser light
  • Coverage on coherence tomography and coherence multiplexing of fiber sensors
  • An expansion of the chapter on imaging with partially coherent light, including several new examples
  • An expanded section on speckle and its properties
  • New sections on the cross-spectrum and bispectrum techniques for obtaining images free from atmospheric distortions
  • A new section on imaging through atmospheric turbulence using coherent light
  • The addition of the effects of “read noise” to the discussions of limitations encountered in detecting very weak optical signals
  • A number of new problems and many new references have been added
Statistical Optics, Second Edition is written for researchers and engineering students interested in optics, physicists and chemists, as well as graduate level courses in a University Engineering or Physics Department.
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About the author

Joseph W. Goodman is an engineer and physicist. He has held a number of positions in the field of optics, including the presidency of the Optical Society of America and the presidency of the International Commission for Optics. He chaired the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University from 1988 until 1996, and served as Senior Associate Dean of Engineering from 1996 through 2000.
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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Apr 20, 2015
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Pages
544
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ISBN
9781119009467
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Physics / Optics & Light
Technology & Engineering / Electrical
Technology & Engineering / Optics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Principles of Optics is one of the classic science books of the twentieth century, and probably the most influential book in optics published in the past 40 years. The new edition is the first ever thoroughly revised and expanded edition of this standard text. Among the new material, much of which is not available in any other optics text, is a section on the CAT scan (computerized axial tomography), which has revolutionized medical diagnostics. The book also includes a new chapter on scattering from inhomogeneous media which provides a comprehensive treatment of the theory of scattering of scalar as well as of electromagnetic waves, including the Born series and the Rytov series. The chapter also presents an account of the principles of diffraction tomography - a refinement of the CAT scan - to which Emil Wolf, one of the authors, has made a basic contribution by formulating in 1969 what is generally regarded to be the basic theorem in this field. The chapter also includes an account of scattering from periodic potentials and its connection to the classic subject of determining the structure of crystals from X-ray diffraction experiments, including accounts of von Laue equations, Bragg's law, the Ewald sphere of reflection and the Ewald limiting sphere, both generalized to continuous media. These topics, although originally introduced in connection with the theory of X-ray diffraction by crystals, have since become of considerable relevance to optics, for example in connection with deep holograms. Other new topics covered in this new edition include interference with broad-band light, which introduces the reader to an important phenomenon discovered relatively recently by Emil Wolf, namely the generation of shifts of spectral lines and other modifications of spectra of radiated fields due to the state of coherence of a source. There is also a section on the so-called Rayleigh-Sommerfield diffraction theory which, in recent times, has been finding increasing popularity among optical scientists. There are also several new appendices, including one on energy conservation in scalar wavefields, which is seldom discussed in books on optics. The new edition of this standard reference will continue to be invaluable to advanced undergraduates, graduate students and researchers working in most areas of optics.
Covers the fundamental principles behind optomechanical design

This book emphasizes a practical, systems-level overview of optomechanical engineering, showing throughout how the requirements on the optical system flow down to those on the optomechanical design. The author begins with an overview of optical engineering, including optical fundamentals as well as the fabrication and alignment of optical components such as lenses and mirrors. The concepts of optomechanical engineering are then applied to the design of optical systems, including the structural design of mechanical and optical components, structural dynamics, thermal design, and kinematic design.

Optomechanical Systems Engineering:

Reviews the fundamental concepts of optical engineering as they apply to optomechanical design Illustrates the fabrication and alignment requirements typically found in an optical system Examines the elements of structural design from a mechanical, optical, and vibrational viewpoint Develops the thermal management principles of temperature and distortion control Describes the optomechanical requirements for kinematic and semi-kinematic mounts Uses examples and case studies to illustrate the concepts and equations presented in the book Provides supplemental materials on a companion website

Focusing on fundamental concepts and first-order estimates of optomechanical system performance, Optomechanical Systems Engineering is accessible to engineers, scientists, and managers who want to quickly master the principles of optomechanical engineering.

The Fourier transform is one of the most important mathematical tools in a wide variety of fields in science and engineering. In the abstract it can be viewed as the transformation of a signal in one domain (typically time or space) into another domain, the frequency domain. Applications of Fourier transforms, often called Fourier analysis or harmonic analysis, provide useful decompositions of signals into fundamental or "primitive" components, provide shortcuts to the computation of complicated sums and integrals, and often reveal hidden structure in data. Fourier analysis lies at the base of many theories of science and plays a fundamental role in practical engineering design. The origins of Fourier analysis in science can be found in Ptolemy's decomposing celestial orbits into cycles and epicycles and Pythagorus' de composing music into consonances. Its modern history began with the eighteenth century work of Bernoulli, Euler, and Gauss on what later came to be known as Fourier series. J. Fourier in his 1822 Theorie analytique de la Chaleur [16] (still available as a Dover reprint) was the first to claim that arbitrary periodic functions could be expanded in a trigonometric (later called a Fourier) series, a claim that was eventually shown to be incorrect, although not too far from the truth. It is an amusing historical sidelight that this work won a prize from the French Academy, in spite of serious concerns expressed by the judges (Laplace, Lagrange, and Legendre) re garding Fourier's lack of rigor.
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