France: The Dark Years, 1940-1944

OUP Oxford
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The French call them 'the Dark Years'... This definitive new history of Occupied France explores the myths and realities of four of the most divisive years in French history. Taking in ordinary people's experiences of defeat, collaboration, resistance, and liberation, it uncovers the conflicting memories of occupation which ensure that even today France continues to debate the legacy of the Vichy years.
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Additional Information

Publisher
OUP Oxford
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Published on
Mar 6, 2003
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Pages
688
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ISBN
9780191622885
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / France
History / Europe / General
History / Military / World War II
Political Science / Terrorism
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Julian Jackson


Jean Renoir's masterpiece La Grande Illusion (1937) tells the story of two French prisoners of war escaping through Germany towards France during World War I. Its themes of divided class, racial and national loyalties and the conflict between patriotism and pacifism made it a controversial film on its release on the eve of World War II. Goebbels, who had once declared the film 'Cinematic Public Enemy Number 1', ordered the prints to be confiscated during the Nazi Occupation of France.

Julian Jackson's compelling study places the film in the context of Renoir's involvement with the left-wing Popular Front, which was split between supporters of an anti-Fascist war and believers in peace at all costs. Jackson highlights the film's ambiguity in its treatnebt of patriotism and pacifism and argues that it is suspended between two historical moments – the Popular Front of the 1930s and the Vichy regime of the 1940s. He traces the film's history after its release – it was banned during the 'phoney war' for its pacifist undertones; banned by the Nazis for being too patriotic; disliked by the Resistance for portraying the Germans too sympathetically and for its treatment of anti-Semitism.

Jackson discusses the unforgettable performances of Jean Gabin as the working-class Lieutentant Maréchal, Pierre Fresnay as the aristocratic Captain de Boëldieu, Erich von Stroheim as the upper-class Captain von Rauffenstein and Marcel Dalio as the French Jew Rosenthal. He analyses Renoir's highly individual filming style and explores his conception of cinematic 'realism'. Finally, he offers his own answer to the mystery of the film's title: what was the great illusion?


JULIAN JACKSON is Professor of Modern History at Queen Mary, University of London. His publications include The Popular Front in France: Defending Democracy 1934-1938 (1988), France: The Dark Years 1940–1944 (2001) and The Fall of France (2003), which was the joint winner of the 2004 Wolfson Prize for history. He is a fellow of the British Academy and Commandeur dans l'Ordre des Palmes Academiques.
Eric Haney
Now the inspiration for the CBS Television drama, "The Unit."

Delta Force. They are the U.S. Army's most elite top-secret strike force. They dominate the modern battlefield, but you won't hear about their heroics on CNN. No headlines can reveal their top-secret missions, and no book has ever taken readers inside—until now. Here, a founding member of Delta Force takes us behind the veil of secrecy and into the action-to reveal the never-before-told story of 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-D (Delta Force).

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In this dramatic behind-the-scenes chronicle, Eric Haney, one of the founding members of Delta Force, takes us inside this legendary counterterrorist unit. Here, for the first time, are details of the grueling selection process—designed to break the strongest of men—that singles out the best of the best: the Delta Force Operator.

With heart-stopping immediacy, Haney tells what it's really like to enter a hostage-held airplane. And from his days in Beirut, Haney tells an unforgettable tale of bodyguards and bombs, of a day-to-day life of madness and beauty, and of how he and a teammate are called on to kill two gunmen targeting U.S. Marines at the Beirut airport. As part of the team sent to rescue American hostages in Tehran, Haney offers a first-person description of that failed mission that is a chilling, compelling account of a bold maneuver undone by chance—and a few fatal mistakes.

From fighting guerrilla warfare in Honduras to rescuing missionaries in Sudan and leading the way onto the island of Grenada, Eric Haney captures the daring and discipline that distinguish the men of Delta Force. Inside Delta Force brings honor to these singular men while it puts us in the middle of action that is sudden, frightening, and nonstop around the world.


From the Hardcover edition.
Julian Jackson


Jean Renoir's masterpiece La Grande Illusion (1937) tells the story of two French prisoners of war escaping through Germany towards France during World War I. Its themes of divided class, racial and national loyalties and the conflict between patriotism and pacifism made it a controversial film on its release on the eve of World War II. Goebbels, who had once declared the film 'Cinematic Public Enemy Number 1', ordered the prints to be confiscated during the Nazi Occupation of France.

Julian Jackson's compelling study places the film in the context of Renoir's involvement with the left-wing Popular Front, which was split between supporters of an anti-Fascist war and believers in peace at all costs. Jackson highlights the film's ambiguity in its treatnebt of patriotism and pacifism and argues that it is suspended between two historical moments – the Popular Front of the 1930s and the Vichy regime of the 1940s. He traces the film's history after its release – it was banned during the 'phoney war' for its pacifist undertones; banned by the Nazis for being too patriotic; disliked by the Resistance for portraying the Germans too sympathetically and for its treatment of anti-Semitism.

Jackson discusses the unforgettable performances of Jean Gabin as the working-class Lieutentant Maréchal, Pierre Fresnay as the aristocratic Captain de Boëldieu, Erich von Stroheim as the upper-class Captain von Rauffenstein and Marcel Dalio as the French Jew Rosenthal. He analyses Renoir's highly individual filming style and explores his conception of cinematic 'realism'. Finally, he offers his own answer to the mystery of the film's title: what was the great illusion?


JULIAN JACKSON is Professor of Modern History at Queen Mary, University of London. His publications include The Popular Front in France: Defending Democracy 1934-1938 (1988), France: The Dark Years 1940–1944 (2001) and The Fall of France (2003), which was the joint winner of the 2004 Wolfson Prize for history. He is a fellow of the British Academy and Commandeur dans l'Ordre des Palmes Academiques.
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