William B. Cushing in the Far East: A Civil War Naval Hero Abroad, 1865-1869

McFarland
Free sample

Fresh from success in sinking the Albermarle in the Civil War, the young Captain Cushing was assigned to command the gunboat USS Maumee in Hong Kong to aid the restoration of America’s naval power in Asia. By linking such aims to British policy, and by courting Chinese and Japanese officials, he succeeded in re-establishing American naval and commercial power in the Far East. In his letters to his fiancée, he brilliantly recorded his travels and observations of people and places (and the difficulties of reconciling his naval career with his devotion to her, whom he married in 1870).
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About the author

The late Julian R. McQuiston was a retired history professor from SUNY Fredonia. He also taught at the University of Columbia and the University of London and was published in many journals, including the English Historical Review.
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Additional Information

Publisher
McFarland
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Published on
Jan 8, 2013
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Pages
228
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ISBN
9780786492633
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
History / United States / Civil War Period (1850-1877)
Transportation / Ships & Shipbuilding / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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