Contemporary World Fiction: A Guide to Literature in Translation

In a globalized world, knowledge about non-North American societies and cultures is a must. Contemporary World Fiction: A Guide to Literature in Translation provides an overview of the tremendous range and scope of translated world fiction available in English. In so doing, it will help readers get a sense of the vast world beyond North America that is conveyed by fiction titles from dozens of countries and language traditions.

Within the guide, approximately 1,000 contemporary non-English-language fiction titles are fully annotated and thousands of others are listed. Organization is primarily by language, as language often reflects cultural cohesion better than national borders or geographies, but also by country and culture. In addition to contemporary titles, each chapter features a brief overview of earlier translated fiction from the group. The guide also provides in-depth bibliographic essays for each chapter that will enable librarians and library users to further explore the literature of numerous languages and cultural traditions.

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About the author

Juris Dilevko is associate professor in the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

Keren Dali, PhD, is assistant professor at the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

Glenda Garbutt received a master of information studies degree from the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

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Additional Information

Publisher
ABC-CLIO
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Published on
Dec 31, 2011
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Pages
526
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ISBN
9781591583530
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Library & Information Science / Collection Development
Language Arts & Disciplines / Library & Information Science / General
Reference / Bibliographies & Indexes
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Juris Dilevko
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Juris Dilevko
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