A Second Treasury of Kahlil Gibran

Open Road Media
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Works on joy and sorrow, life and love, by Kahlil Gibran, one of the most celebrated modern philosophers
In this magnificent volume, Gibran’s writings have been translated from their native Arabic to English by Anthony Rizcallah Ferris. The collection includes The Broken Wings, an exquisitely tender, poetic love story; The Voice of the Master, a remarkable study of life; and Thoughts and Meditations, containing Gibran’s spiritual message to the world. Each work, studded with gems of wisdom and truth, adds up to a warm, lively, and philosophical portrait of one of the twentieth century’s greatest poetic masters.
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A special and deluxe illustrated edition of the inspirational, million-copy bestselling classic. The perfect gift for anyone journeying and questioning on the road of life.
Few books can be described as universal. And yet, The Prophet, by Lebanese-American author Kahlil Gibran, can only be described as that. Originally published in 1923, The Prophet is considered Gibran's masterpiece and is one of the most beloved spiritual classics of all time. Further cementing its status as a worldwide classic is the fact that it has been translated into over 100 different languages, making it one of the most translated books in history. Drawn from Gibran's own experience as an immigrant, The Prophet transcends generations, languages, and borders.
In this beautiful meditation on the meaning of life, Al Mustafa, the prophet, is about to board a ship back to his homeland after 12 years spent living in exile in the city of Orphalese. Before he departs, he is stopped by a group of followers who ask him to share his wisdom. In twenty-six poetic essays, Al Mustafa offers profound and timeless insights on various aspects of life and the myriad impulses of the human heart and mind. He offers lessons on love, marriage, children, pain, friendship, beauty, religion, joy, knowledge, reason and passion, time, good and evil, pleasure, and death.
A timeless spiritual touchstone, this gorgeously illustrated gift edition is perfect for graduating students, or for anyone searching for solace, peace, hope, and purpose in today's world.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Dec 20, 2011
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Pages
368
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ISBN
9781453235553
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Collections / Middle Eastern
Philosophy / Eastern
Philosophy / Reference
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Do Ask, Do Tell: Speech Is a Fundamental Right, Being Listened to Is a Privilege is the third of a sequence of my Do Ask, Do Tell books. The general themes of the books are individualism and personal responsibility, and especially how these precepts apply to gay equality and free speech issues. The first book was Do Ask, Do Tell: A Gay Conservative Lashes Back in 1997. The book was motivated by the early fight over gays in the military that ensued after President Clintons inauguration in 1993. There is a long narrative going back to my own expulsion from a civilian college and then my experience with the military draft, which makes for a certain irony. The book, toward the end, switches from historical and autobiographical accounts to policy discussions on discrimination in other areas, which are presented in a manner concentric to the military issue as like a superstorm core. One important concept is that individual rights are connected to the ability to share risks (like availability for military service) that belong to the common good. In late 1998, I published a supplementary booklet, less than a hundred pages, called Our Fundamental Rights, which does not carry the Do Ask, Do Tell prefix. In 2002, I published Do Ask Do Tell: When Liberty Is Stressed, a set of essays that respond to the issues accentuated by the 9/11 attacks and by new legal threats to Internet speech (such as the 1998 Child Online Protection Act, or COPA). One idea that I covered in the book was a Bill of Rights II. The latest book traces these widely dispersed issues centered around individualism further, particularly in areas like various threats to Internet freedom that we take for granted, gay equality (including marriage and parenting), the workplace, and eldercare, the latter driven by rapid demographic change. The new book is in two parts. Part 1 comprises a prologue and six nonfiction chapters about different problem areas, with recreation of a variety of incidents at various points in my life. However, the sequence of narration is not chronological, as it was in the first book. Part 2 consists of three short stories. The stories demonstrate some of the ideas in the nonfiction chapters. One, written in 1969, is a somewhat fictionalized account of my own Basic Combat Training experience in 1968. The second, written in 1981, depicts two former college roommates reuniting and going on a trip through countryside heavily damaged by strip-mining for coal. The third, written in 2013, presents another road trip, this one more bizarre, with the protagonist, having gotten what he wants, returns home to find a world besieged with an unusual catastrophe and ready to accept the idea of an instant family, like it or not. My ideas about how to process all the questions about individual rights have become more subtle and far more personal. Back in the 1990s, it was easy to say that social and political policy should be fiscally conservative yet socially liberal. Libertarian positions, of minimal government at all levels, seemed to promote individual rights; there was no legitimate reason for the state to concern itself with adults in the bedroom or even what they choose to put into their own bodies. Of course, even then, as I discussed in the first book, there were enormous practical tensions. Even though there were plenty of complaints that gays and singles were not treated equally in public policy, in practice people without families often had much more discretionary income and much more time for their own pursuits. In time, it has become apparent that the disinclination of many people to have children at all can lead to enormous problems in the future in funding retirement income and health and custodial care. In areas ranging from the epidemiology of HIV to the way bizarre and dangerous infectious diseases are incubated by agricultural practice in the developing world, and in debates about vaccine policy, it is apparent tha
Written over a period of twenty-five years, this first volume in a trilogy is intended to depict in the life and work of writers of different nationalities--Balzac, Dickens, and Dostoevsky--the world-portraying novelist. Though these essays were composed at fairly long intervals, their essential uniformity has prompted Zweig to bring these three great novelists of the nineteenth century together; to show them as writers who, for the very reason that they contrast with each other, also complete one another in ways which makes them round our concept of the epic portrayers of the world.

Zweig considers Balzac, Dickens, and Dostoevsky the supremely great novelists of the nineteenth century. He draws between the writer of one outstanding novel, and what he terms a true novelist--an epic master, the creator of an almost unending series of pre-eminent romances. The novelist in this higher sense is endowed with encyclopedic genius, is a universal artist, who constructs a cosmos, peopling it with types of his own making, giving it laws of gravity that are unique to these fi gures.

Each of the novelists featured in Zweig's book has created his own sphere: Balzac, the world of society; Dickens, the world of the family; Dostoevsky, the world of the One and of the All. A comparison of these spheres serves to prove their diff erences. Zweig does not put a valuation on the differences, or emphasize the national element in the artist, whether in a spirit of sympathy or antipathy. Every great creator is a unity in himself, with its own boundaries and specifi c gravity. There is only one specifi c gravity possible within a single work, and no absolute criterion in the sales of justice. This is the measure of Zweig, and the message of this book.

Longlisted for the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay

From the "astounding" (!--~i~--Entertainment Weekly), "spectacularly evocative" (!--~i~--The Atlantic), and "brilliant" (!--~i~--Los Angeles Times) author of the !--~i~--New York Times bestsellers !--~i~--The Recovering and !--~i~--The Empathy Exams comes a return to the essay form in this expansive new book.

ONE OF THE FALL'S MOST ANTICIPATED BOOKS: Time, Entertainment Weekly, O, Oprah Magazine, Boston Globe, Newsweek, Esquire, Seattle Times, Baltimore Sun, BuzzFeed, BookPage, The Millions, Marie Claire, Good Housekeeping, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Lit Hub, Women's Day, AV Club, Nylon, Bustle, Goop, Goodreads, Book Riot, Yahoo! Lifestyle, Pacific Standard, The Week, and Romper.

With the virtuosic synthesis of memoir, criticism, and journalism for which Leslie Jamison has been so widely acclaimed, the fourteen essays in Make It Scream, Make It Burn explore the oceanic depths of longing and the reverberations of obsession.
Among Jamison's subjects are 52 Blue, deemed "the loneliest whale in the world"; the eerie past-life memories of children; the devoted citizens of an online world called Second Life; the haunted landscape of the Sri Lankan Civil War; and an entire museum dedicated to the relics of broken relationships. Jamison follows these examinations to more personal reckonings -- with elusive men and ruptured romances, with marriage and maternity -- in essays about eloping in Las Vegas, becoming a stepmother, and giving birth.
Often compared to Joan Didion and Susan Sontag, and widely considered one of the defining voices of her generation, Jamison interrogates her own life with the same nuance and rigor she brings to her subjects. The result is a provocative reminder of the joy and sustenance that can be found in the unlikeliest of circumstances.
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