Lines Drawn upon the Water: First Nations and the Great Lakes Borders and Borderlands

Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
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The First Nations who have lived in the Great Lakes watershed have been strongly influenced by the imposition of colonial and national boundaries there. The essays in Lines Drawn upon the Water examine the impact of the Canadian—American border on communities, with reference to national efforts to enforce the boundary and the determination of local groups to pursue their interests and define themselves. Although both governments regard the border as clearly defined, local communities continue to contest the artificial divisions imposed by the international boundary and define spatial and human relationships in the borderlands in their own terms.

The debate is often cast in terms of Canada’s failure to recognize the 1794 Jay Treaty’s confirmation of Native rights to transport goods into Canada, but ultimately the issue concerns the larger struggle of First Nations to force recognition of their people’s rights to move freely across the border in search of economic and social independence.

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About the author

Karl S. Hele, a member of the Garden River First Nation community of Anishinaabeg, is an associate professor and the director of First Peoples Studies at Concordia University. He is the editor of Lines Drawn upon the Water: First Nations and the Great Lakes Borders and Borderlands (WLU Press, 2008).

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Additional Information

Publisher
Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
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Published on
Sep 30, 2008
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Pages
378
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ISBN
9781554580972
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Native American
Political Science / International Relations / General
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / Native American Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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S. C. Gwynne
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