Men, Fathering and the Gender Trap: Sweden and Poland Compared

Springer
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This book provides an account of fatherhood and changing parental roles in Sweden and Poland. It uses a comparative perspective to show what men understand a father’s role to be, and how they seek to live up to it. Fathering, the author argues, is a social phenomenon grounded in cultural patterns of parenting, gender roles and models of masculinity, and also shaped by family policy. Being a father today, she demonstrates, is longer connected solely with being the main breadwinner. Rather, it has become increasingly common for fathers to take on duties traditionally regarded as the domain of women. This means that men often face conflicting expectations based on different models of fatherhood. The aim of this thought-provoking book is to track these models, analysing their origins and their consequences for gender order. It will appeal to students and scholars of gender studies, the sociology of families and social policy studies.
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About the author

Katarzyna Suwada is Assistant Professor at the Institute of Sociology, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Poland. Her research interests focus on family life, gender roles and masculinity.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer
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Published on
Feb 23, 2017
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Pages
315
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ISBN
9783319477824
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Public Policy / General
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Policy
Social Science / Gender Studies
Social Science / General
Social Science / Regional Studies
Social Science / Sociology / General
Social Science / Sociology / Marriage & Family
Social Science / Women's Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Winner of the NBCC Award for General Nonfiction

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