Remembering the Kennebunks

Arcadia Publishing
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The Kennebunksthe phrase evokes peace, ocean breezes and small-town pride. In this captivating collection of vignettes, Kennebunk town historian Kathleen Ostrander reveals another side of the areas allure: its rich and varied past. From an account of the amateur astronomer whose name now graces the Bates College Observatory to the origins of Kennebunks
encyclopedic Walker Diaries, Ostrander offers a tour of the areas historical highlights. She notes the mysterious creature once said to live in the Kennebunk River, treasures hidden in fireplaces and under floorboards and the scandalous murder trial of 1866, during which the wife of deceased doctor, drunk, and temperance supporter Charles Swett was imprisoned on the testimony of her own daughter. Through quirky tales and serious sketches, Ostrander offers an affectionate portrait of the Kennebunks sure to charm and inform.
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About the author

Kathleen Ostrander is the Town Historian of Kennebunk, an appointed position honoring her work to preserve local history. Her weekly column, Paging through History, appeared in the York County Coast Star from 2002-2006. She is the archivist for the Kennebunk Free Librarys Ken Joy Photographic Collection and formerly held a similar position with the Brick Store Museum, Kennebunks main historical repository. She has designed several exhibits for the museum and presents occasional lectures on area history. She is the author of Arcadias Kennebunk and a member of the Kennebunk Art Guild. She also works as a Realtor with Coldwell Banker and serves on the towns Bicentennial Committee.

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Additional Information

Arcadia Publishing
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Published on
Jun 1, 2009
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History / United States / State & Local / New England (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT)
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From the Hardcover edition.
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