Biography of Dr. Seuss: Learn about the life of Dr. Seuss!

Hyperink Inc
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ABOUT THE BOOK

In some ways, Dr. Seuss seems as unexpected and paradoxical a character as one of his own creations. His last name wasn't Seuss, he wasn't a doctor, and he never had his own children – nor was he particularly comfortable around them. When he did consent to answer an interviewer's questions, his replies were often as whimsical as his children's books.

The mystery was part of the legend and served him well, for it's hard for readers to separate the real Dr. Seuss from the fantasyland he dreamed up – a fantasyland that was sorely-needed in the years just before and after the Second World War. Dr. Seuss's books came out at a time when schools were using the often-boring, formulaic Dick and Jane series of books to teach reading to first and second graders. The illustrations were candy-box pretty, and there were no plots, no stories, and certainly no fantasy.

Enter Dr. Seuss, with his Grinches and Hortons and Whos from Whoville. It was a world that children – and adults – had never before seen in children's literature; a world that inspired children to dream big, and to channel their highest ideals and most exciting, adventurous dreams into their own lives. This world also used words in fantastical ways, with a rhythm that virtually reinvented children's poetry.

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About the author

Keely Bautista is an experienced writer and a member of the Hyperink Team, which works hard to bring you high-quality, engaging, fun content. Happy reading!

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Additional Information

Publisher
Hyperink Inc
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Published on
Feb 29, 2012
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Pages
22
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ISBN
9781614648772
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Biography & Autobiography / Literary
Fiction / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Keely Bautista
This book is part of Hyperink's best little books series. This best little book is 3,800+ words of fast, entertaining information on a highly demanded topic. Based on reader feedback (including yours!), we may expand this book in the future. If we do so, we'll send a free copy to all previous buyers.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Agatha Christie's own life was, in many ways, as mysterious as those of her characters. Assuredly it was her predilection for the cryptic that led her to create the fiery-yet-unfathomable Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot. Yet, while Poirot epitomizes the image of the enigmatic detective, his creator was just as inscrutable, making her own life a story worthy of a novel of its own.

Agatha Christie's other great creation, Jane Marple, seems far more accessible, but she keeps her own counsel as well, a trait that Agatha Christie perfected in her own life. It came as no great surprise to her fans that, after her death, secrets from Christie's life suddenly tumbled out in the form of newly-discovered archived recordings she had made decades before. These recordings, completely unknown to the public, provide a new insight into her creations, and created a fascinating denouement that Agatha would have loved.

Why have the writings of this exacting, rather reclusive author resonated with the public for so many generations? The secret is one that Agatha knew well: her stories are about people we can relate to in real life. As Hercule Poirot was fond of saying, everyone has the makings of a criminal in him; the key to success in life is in how we master those darker feelings. As we read an Agatha Christie novel, we realize that we ourselves could easily be one of the characters - and yes, even the murderer.

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

Other than its inventive plot, a major reason for the success of this first novel was the quirky yet captivating character of Hercule Poirot, who was inspired by the Belgian refugees living in England whom Agatha had met during the First World War. She recalled that they had a hard time understanding the British way of doing things, and preferred to assimilate as little of British life as possible.

Throughout the 1920s Agatha completed to write, and produced one of her greatest successes, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, in 1926. This novel was a sensation with the reading public because of its unexpected and even shocking ending, and was so popular that it was made into a movie in 1931, Alibi, which marked the first film appearance of Hercule Poirot.

The 1930s, however, proved to be Agatha's most productive time as a writer. During this decade she wrote a total of 14 Poirot novels and two Miss Marple novels, as well as two books featuring the character Superintendent Battle, two story collections featuring the characters Harley Quin and Mr. Parker Pyne, four additional mystery books, two plays and a novel under her pseudonym, Mary Westmacott...

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Keely Bautista
ABOUT THE BOOK

When Amelia Earhart took off for her around-the-world flight in 1937, no one would have suspected that within weeks, she would vanish into thin air. More than 70 years later, her vanishing act is still hotly debated by researchers, investigators and history buffs. Celebrated in books and movies and admired for her achievements, Amelia Earhart is equally well known as the 20th century's most famous "missing persons" case.

Among all of the uncertainties surrounding her fate, one thing is certain the public would never have this level of fascination with Amelia Earhart were she not such a captivating, fascinating personality. Her talent, charisma and courage were matched by her joie de vivre, as well as her adventurous outlook. Earhart maintained that women had just as much right to adventure and achievement as men.

By her own admission, Amelia loved the limelight, but her publicity served a far more noble purpose than self aggrandizement; it carved out a path of opportunity for the women who came before and after her. She was well aware of this, and felt the responsibility that came with being a trailblazer.

MEET THE AUTHOR

Pauline T. is an experienced writer and a member of the Hyperink Team, which works hard to bring you high-quality, engaging, fun content. Happy reading!

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

Amelia Mary Earhart was born on July 24, 1897, in Atchison, Kansas. As the daughter of a prominent railroad attorney, Amelia spent her early years living in Midwestern railway towns such as including Kansas City and Des Moines. Growing up with her younger sister Muriel, Amelia was the tomboy of the family, climbing trees, belly slamming her sled down treacherous hills and even hunting rats with a .22 rifle. Another hobby for the young Amelia was collecting newspaper clippings about women who had succeeded in male dominated fields such as mechanical engineering, law and industry; these women became her early heroes.

Amelia's life of adventure began during World War I when she decided to leave school and help the war effort by tending wounded soldiers. After taking a Red Cross course, Amelia spent a year in Canada as a nurses' aid in a military hospital. This experience led her to enroll in the pre med program at New York's Columbia University. Her medical education ended when her parents asked her to join them in California.

Shortly after moving to California, Amelia revived an old interest her fascination with flight. During the First World War, she found herself captivated when a stunt pilot at an air show "buzzed" her and a friend, swooping low and then just missing them. As she said later, "I believe that little red airplane said something to me as it swished by."

CHAPTER OUTLINE

Biography of Amelia Earhart

+ Introduction

+ A Typical Midwest Girl

+ Fame and Achievements

+ The Final Flight

+ ...and much more

Keely Bautista
ABOUT THE BOOK

When Amelia Earhart took off for her around-the-world flight in 1937, no one would have suspected that within weeks, she would vanish into thin air. More than 70 years later, her vanishing act is still hotly debated by researchers, investigators and history buffs. Celebrated in books and movies and admired for her achievements, Amelia Earhart is equally well known as the 20th century's most famous "missing persons" case.

Among all of the uncertainties surrounding her fate, one thing is certain the public would never have this level of fascination with Amelia Earhart were she not such a captivating, fascinating personality. Her talent, charisma and courage were matched by her joie de vivre, as well as her adventurous outlook. Earhart maintained that women had just as much right to adventure and achievement as men.

By her own admission, Amelia loved the limelight, but her publicity served a far more noble purpose than self aggrandizement; it carved out a path of opportunity for the women who came before and after her. She was well aware of this, and felt the responsibility that came with being a trailblazer.

MEET THE AUTHOR

Pauline T. is an experienced writer and a member of the Hyperink Team, which works hard to bring you high-quality, engaging, fun content. Happy reading!

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

Amelia Mary Earhart was born on July 24, 1897, in Atchison, Kansas. As the daughter of a prominent railroad attorney, Amelia spent her early years living in Midwestern railway towns such as including Kansas City and Des Moines. Growing up with her younger sister Muriel, Amelia was the tomboy of the family, climbing trees, belly slamming her sled down treacherous hills and even hunting rats with a .22 rifle. Another hobby for the young Amelia was collecting newspaper clippings about women who had succeeded in male dominated fields such as mechanical engineering, law and industry; these women became her early heroes.

Amelia's life of adventure began during World War I when she decided to leave school and help the war effort by tending wounded soldiers. After taking a Red Cross course, Amelia spent a year in Canada as a nurses' aid in a military hospital. This experience led her to enroll in the pre med program at New York's Columbia University. Her medical education ended when her parents asked her to join them in California.

Shortly after moving to California, Amelia revived an old interest her fascination with flight. During the First World War, she found herself captivated when a stunt pilot at an air show "buzzed" her and a friend, swooping low and then just missing them. As she said later, "I believe that little red airplane said something to me as it swished by."

CHAPTER OUTLINE

Biography of Amelia Earhart

+ Introduction

+ A Typical Midwest Girl

+ Fame and Achievements

+ The Final Flight

+ ...and much more

Keely Bautista
ABOUT THE BOOK

We've all read stories about adventurous travelers who backpacked across the Himalayas and slept in the wilds every night. Or perhaps you know someone who traipsed through Europe in their youth, staying in dorm-like hostels and eating only bread and cheese for months at a time.

These stories are entertaining to read about, but it's not always fun to travel this way. It's risky and can even be dangerous, especially if you're completely alone and in need of assistance at some point. In addition, most of us don't really want to experience the adventures of travel if we're going to be constantly worried about where our next meal is coming from or how we're going to be able to afford a motel room that night.

The good news is that you can have gypsy feet without living like a gypsy. Thanks to competitive pricing within the travel industry, air fares and hotel accommodations can easily be found at cut-rate prices. Discount railway tickets and car rental rates are also available for those who have the patience to do a little bargain hunting, and half-price coupons for resort attractions are featured on hundreds of websites.

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

During shoulder-season months, plane fares are discounted and hotel and motel rates are lower as well. In addition, many local restaurants offer two-for-one deals during the off-season, and tourist attractions offer discounted tickets and two-for-one passes.

Once you choose your destination, find out when the off-season is, and if possible, plan to travel during those months. You'll not only save a great deal of money; you'll also save time, and wear and tear by not having to stand in line for attractions. If the weather cooperates, resort towns can be a lot of fun during shoulder-season months because you'll get a better opportunity to experience the town in the same way that the locals do. By not having to fight high-season crowds, you'll also be able to enjoy a more peaceful, leisurely vacation.

Traveling off-season can bring some delightful surprises as well. Recently, my husband and I took a road trip to Telluride in mid-spring just after the ski resorts had closed. When we got there, we found that the lifts were still operating and providing free rides up and down the mountains all day for off-season tourists. The views were stunning, even without the snow, and we traveled up and down the beautiful mountains of Telluride for the better part of an afternoon without paying a cent...

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CHAPTER OUTLINE

Modern Lifestyles: Tips for Travelling on a Budget

+ Introduction

+ Plan Before You Go

+ Time Means Money

+ Packing Light

+ ...and much more

Keely Bautista
ABOUT THE BOOK

For those who have dealt with, or are dealing with, breast cancer, the ramifications of the disease are well known. For those who have not dealt with it, the fear is always there: What are my chances of getting breast cancer? What happens to me if there's a history of it in my family?

Chances are you know someone who has had breast cancer, or you may be a breast cancer survivor yourself. According to the National Cancer Institute, one out of every seven women born today will have a diagnosis of breast cancer at some point.

Even with the passing of time, the pain of

losing a loved one to breast cancer never fades. My husband's mother died of breast cancer during the 1990s, and to this day he still lashes out against this disease that shortened her life. Grief, anger – these are the emotions triggered by this disease.

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

According to the National Institute of Health, no one can perfectly pinpoint the exact causes or risk factors for breast cancer. Perhaps surprisingly, the majority of women who get breast cancer have no family history of the disease. To offset this data, however, we have another sobering statistic: approximately 20-30 percent of breast cancer patients do, in fact, have a family history of breast cancer.

The NIH also points out that a breast cancer patient who has cancer in one breast is at a higher risk for getting cancer in the other breast as well. Another risk factor concerns age: a woman of over 60 is at the greatest risk for developing breast cancer.

Early menstruation and late menopause pose a risk factor as well. Women who started their menstrual cycles before the age of 12 or who experienced menopause after the age of 55 also have a higher risk of developing breast cancer....

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Keely Bautista
ABOUT THE BOOK

You're traveling through a small mountain town in Italy by yourself, and you're hopelessly lost. To make things worse, you accidentally left your money back in your lodgings and you don't speak a word of Italian. What should you do?

In this worthy-of-a-nightmare scenario, it's not about what you should do; it's about what you should have done before you even left home. Many travelers don't realize the importance of learning a few words and phrases in the primary language of the country they're going to.

This is especially important if you're backpacking, because chances are you'll be far removed from metropolitan tourist areas where you might be able to find a fellow American.

If you plan on backpacking through Italy, the most important thing you can put in your backpack is an English-Italian phrase book. You don't need a large dictionary; just a compact book that gives you the most important, day-to-day living phrases to help you get around.

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

Consonants: Hard And Soft Sounds

One "c" consonant is pronounced hard, like a "k."

Two "c" consonants together are always pronounced as "ch."

The consonant "g" is pronounced like a hard "g," unless it's in front of the vowels "i" or "e," when it's pronounced soft, like a "j."

There is no "w" in the Italian language; the "w" sound is indicated by the two vowels, "u" and "a," together.

"Sc" is pronounced like "sh" when it's followed by an "i" or an "e." Otherwise, "sc" is pronounced like "sk."

"Sch" is pronounced like "sk."

"Gh" is pronounced with a hard "g."

"Z" is pronounced "ts."

The "h" is silent in words like "ho" ("io ho" mean "I have")

When "n" follows a "g," the sound is "nyo" (as in the Italian word for bath, "bagno," which is pronounced "bah-nyo").

"S" between two vowels is pronounced "z."

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CHAPTER OUTLINE

250 Useful Italian Phrases while Backpacking

+ Introduction

+ Consonants: Hard and Soft Sounds

+ Vowels

+ Common Situations

+ ...and much more

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