Biography of Dr. Seuss: Learn about the life of Dr. Seuss!

Hyperink Inc
1
Free sample

ABOUT THE BOOK

In some ways, Dr. Seuss seems as unexpected and paradoxical a character as one of his own creations. His last name wasn't Seuss, he wasn't a doctor, and he never had his own children – nor was he particularly comfortable around them. When he did consent to answer an interviewer's questions, his replies were often as whimsical as his children's books.

The mystery was part of the legend and served him well, for it's hard for readers to separate the real Dr. Seuss from the fantasyland he dreamed up – a fantasyland that was sorely-needed in the years just before and after the Second World War. Dr. Seuss's books came out at a time when schools were using the often-boring, formulaic Dick and Jane series of books to teach reading to first and second graders. The illustrations were candy-box pretty, and there were no plots, no stories, and certainly no fantasy.

Enter Dr. Seuss, with his Grinches and Hortons and Whos from Whoville. It was a world that children – and adults – had never before seen in children's literature; a world that inspired children to dream big, and to channel their highest ideals and most exciting, adventurous dreams into their own lives. This world also used words in fantastical ways, with a rhythm that virtually reinvented children's poetry.

Read more

About the author

Keely Bautista is an experienced writer and a member of the Hyperink Team, which works hard to bring you high-quality, engaging, fun content. Happy reading!

Read more
5.0
1 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Hyperink Inc
Read more
Published on
Feb 29, 2012
Read more
Pages
22
Read more
ISBN
9781614648772
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Biography & Autobiography / Literary
Fiction / General
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
This book is part of Hyperink's best little books series. This best little book is 3,800+ words of fast, entertaining information on a highly demanded topic. Based on reader feedback (including yours!), we may expand this book in the future. If we do so, we'll send a free copy to all previous buyers.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Agatha Christie's own life was, in many ways, as mysterious as those of her characters. Assuredly it was her predilection for the cryptic that led her to create the fiery-yet-unfathomable Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot. Yet, while Poirot epitomizes the image of the enigmatic detective, his creator was just as inscrutable, making her own life a story worthy of a novel of its own.

Agatha Christie's other great creation, Jane Marple, seems far more accessible, but she keeps her own counsel as well, a trait that Agatha Christie perfected in her own life. It came as no great surprise to her fans that, after her death, secrets from Christie's life suddenly tumbled out in the form of newly-discovered archived recordings she had made decades before. These recordings, completely unknown to the public, provide a new insight into her creations, and created a fascinating denouement that Agatha would have loved.

Why have the writings of this exacting, rather reclusive author resonated with the public for so many generations? The secret is one that Agatha knew well: her stories are about people we can relate to in real life. As Hercule Poirot was fond of saying, everyone has the makings of a criminal in him; the key to success in life is in how we master those darker feelings. As we read an Agatha Christie novel, we realize that we ourselves could easily be one of the characters - and yes, even the murderer.

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

Other than its inventive plot, a major reason for the success of this first novel was the quirky yet captivating character of Hercule Poirot, who was inspired by the Belgian refugees living in England whom Agatha had met during the First World War. She recalled that they had a hard time understanding the British way of doing things, and preferred to assimilate as little of British life as possible.

Throughout the 1920s Agatha completed to write, and produced one of her greatest successes, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, in 1926. This novel was a sensation with the reading public because of its unexpected and even shocking ending, and was so popular that it was made into a movie in 1931, Alibi, which marked the first film appearance of Hercule Poirot.

The 1930s, however, proved to be Agatha's most productive time as a writer. During this decade she wrote a total of 14 Poirot novels and two Miss Marple novels, as well as two books featuring the character Superintendent Battle, two story collections featuring the characters Harley Quin and Mr. Parker Pyne, four additional mystery books, two plays and a novel under her pseudonym, Mary Westmacott...

Buy a copy to keep reading!

In April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. His name was Christopher Johnson McCandless. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself. Four months later, his decomposed body was found by a moose hunter.  How McCandless came to die is the unforgettable story of Into the Wild.

Immediately after graduating from college in 1991, McCandless had roamed through the West and Southwest on a vision quest like those made by his heroes Jack London and John Muir.  In the Mojave Desert he abandoned his car, stripped it of its license plates, and burned all of his  cash.  He would give himself a new name, Alexander Supertramp, and , unencumbered by money and belongings, he would be free to wallow in the raw, unfiltered experiences that nature presented.  Craving a blank spot on the map, McCandless simply threw the maps away.  Leaving behind his desperate parents and sister, he vanished into the wild.

Jon Krakauer constructs a clarifying prism through which he reassembles the disquieting facts of McCandless's short life.  Admitting an interst that borders on obsession, he searches for the clues to the dries and desires that propelled McCandless.  Digging deeply, he takes an inherently compelling mystery and unravels the larger riddles it holds: the profound pull of the American wilderness on our imagination; the allure of high-risk activities to young men of a certain cast of mind; the complex, charged bond between fathers and sons.

When McCandless's innocent mistakes turn out to be irreversible and fatal, he becomes the stuff of tabloid headlines and is dismissed for his naiveté, pretensions, and hubris.  He is said  to have had a death wish but wanting to die is a very different thing from being compelled to look over the edge. Krakauer brings McCandless's uncompromising pilgrimage out of the shadows, and the peril, adversity , and renunciation sought by this enigmatic young man are illuminated with a rare understanding--and not an ounce of sentimentality. Mesmerizing, heartbreaking, Into the Wild is a tour de force. The power and luminosity of Jon Krakauer's stoytelling blaze through every page.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
ABOUT THE BOOK

When Amelia Earhart took off for her around-the-world flight in 1937, no one would have suspected that within weeks, she would vanish into thin air. More than 70 years later, her vanishing act is still hotly debated by researchers, investigators and history buffs. Celebrated in books and movies and admired for her achievements, Amelia Earhart is equally well known as the 20th century's most famous "missing persons" case.

Among all of the uncertainties surrounding her fate, one thing is certain the public would never have this level of fascination with Amelia Earhart were she not such a captivating, fascinating personality. Her talent, charisma and courage were matched by her joie de vivre, as well as her adventurous outlook. Earhart maintained that women had just as much right to adventure and achievement as men.

By her own admission, Amelia loved the limelight, but her publicity served a far more noble purpose than self aggrandizement; it carved out a path of opportunity for the women who came before and after her. She was well aware of this, and felt the responsibility that came with being a trailblazer.

MEET THE AUTHOR

Pauline T. is an experienced writer and a member of the Hyperink Team, which works hard to bring you high-quality, engaging, fun content. Happy reading!

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

Amelia Mary Earhart was born on July 24, 1897, in Atchison, Kansas. As the daughter of a prominent railroad attorney, Amelia spent her early years living in Midwestern railway towns such as including Kansas City and Des Moines. Growing up with her younger sister Muriel, Amelia was the tomboy of the family, climbing trees, belly slamming her sled down treacherous hills and even hunting rats with a .22 rifle. Another hobby for the young Amelia was collecting newspaper clippings about women who had succeeded in male dominated fields such as mechanical engineering, law and industry; these women became her early heroes.

Amelia's life of adventure began during World War I when she decided to leave school and help the war effort by tending wounded soldiers. After taking a Red Cross course, Amelia spent a year in Canada as a nurses' aid in a military hospital. This experience led her to enroll in the pre med program at New York's Columbia University. Her medical education ended when her parents asked her to join them in California.

Shortly after moving to California, Amelia revived an old interest her fascination with flight. During the First World War, she found herself captivated when a stunt pilot at an air show "buzzed" her and a friend, swooping low and then just missing them. As she said later, "I believe that little red airplane said something to me as it swished by."

CHAPTER OUTLINE

Biography of Amelia Earhart

+ Introduction

+ A Typical Midwest Girl

+ Fame and Achievements

+ The Final Flight

+ ...and much more

This book is part of Hyperink's best little books series. This best little book is 3,800+ words of fast, entertaining information on a highly demanded topic. Based on reader feedback (including yours!), we may expand this book in the future. If we do so, we'll send a free copy to all previous buyers.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Agatha Christie's own life was, in many ways, as mysterious as those of her characters. Assuredly it was her predilection for the cryptic that led her to create the fiery-yet-unfathomable Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot. Yet, while Poirot epitomizes the image of the enigmatic detective, his creator was just as inscrutable, making her own life a story worthy of a novel of its own.

Agatha Christie's other great creation, Jane Marple, seems far more accessible, but she keeps her own counsel as well, a trait that Agatha Christie perfected in her own life. It came as no great surprise to her fans that, after her death, secrets from Christie's life suddenly tumbled out in the form of newly-discovered archived recordings she had made decades before. These recordings, completely unknown to the public, provide a new insight into her creations, and created a fascinating denouement that Agatha would have loved.

Why have the writings of this exacting, rather reclusive author resonated with the public for so many generations? The secret is one that Agatha knew well: her stories are about people we can relate to in real life. As Hercule Poirot was fond of saying, everyone has the makings of a criminal in him; the key to success in life is in how we master those darker feelings. As we read an Agatha Christie novel, we realize that we ourselves could easily be one of the characters - and yes, even the murderer.

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

Other than its inventive plot, a major reason for the success of this first novel was the quirky yet captivating character of Hercule Poirot, who was inspired by the Belgian refugees living in England whom Agatha had met during the First World War. She recalled that they had a hard time understanding the British way of doing things, and preferred to assimilate as little of British life as possible.

Throughout the 1920s Agatha completed to write, and produced one of her greatest successes, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, in 1926. This novel was a sensation with the reading public because of its unexpected and even shocking ending, and was so popular that it was made into a movie in 1931, Alibi, which marked the first film appearance of Hercule Poirot.

The 1930s, however, proved to be Agatha's most productive time as a writer. During this decade she wrote a total of 14 Poirot novels and two Miss Marple novels, as well as two books featuring the character Superintendent Battle, two story collections featuring the characters Harley Quin and Mr. Parker Pyne, four additional mystery books, two plays and a novel under her pseudonym, Mary Westmacott...

Buy a copy to keep reading!

ABOUT THE BOOK

The position of First Lady is a tricky one; it's not a political or appointed office, yet during any presidential administration, her name (and personality) is far more known that that of the vice president or secretary of state. Likewise, the First Lady has, potentially, the ear of the president in a far more influential way than these other elected officials. Until recent years, most First Ladies made a deliberate choice not to get involved with the politics of running the country.

Eleanor Roosevelt's sense of duty, however, as well as her lifelong commitment to humanitarianism, led her to choose a different route. Still, by her own admission, her instincts for self-effacement would have probably kept her out of the political limelight, were it not for the crippling polio that curtailed many of her husband's speech-making appearances after 1921.

The timing for a First Lady such as Eleanor could not have been more auspicious. When Franklin Roosevelt took office as President of the United States, the country was in the grip of a fierce depression that threatened to topple its financial foundations. As the decade segued into the 1940s, the world became involved in a war against Nazism and Fascism. Domestically, racial and gender inequalities ran rife throughout the United States, at a time when the nation, more than ever, could not survive such division.

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

There is a famous photo of Eleanor and Franklin in their car during Inauguration Day, looking confident and even radiantly happy. It belied her true feelings of fear that she would be forced, for the sake of political correctness, into abandoning some of her pet projects a scenario she had no intention of allowing. That evening, Eleanor, the least socialite of all Washington wives, donned a silver-blue gown and fur coat and attended, by herself, the inaugural ball. She would be the only First Lady ever to do so without her husband, because Franklin didn't want to be publicly seen in a wheelchair and unable to dance.

According to the second volume of her autobiography, This I Remember, Eleanor said of her husband's presidency (and her own prominence) to her friend, reporter Lorena Hickok, "I never wanted it, even though some people have said that my ambition for myself drove him on...I never wanted to be a President's wife, and I don't want it now."

Buy a copy to keep reading!

CHAPTER OUTLINE

Biography of Eleanor Roosevelt

+ Introduction

+ Beginnings

+ First Lady of a State and a Nation

+ White House Years

+ ...and much more

ABOUT THE BOOK

When Amelia Earhart took off for her around-the-world flight in 1937, no one would have suspected that within weeks, she would vanish into thin air. More than 70 years later, her vanishing act is still hotly debated by researchers, investigators and history buffs. Celebrated in books and movies and admired for her achievements, Amelia Earhart is equally well known as the 20th century's most famous "missing persons" case.

Among all of the uncertainties surrounding her fate, one thing is certain the public would never have this level of fascination with Amelia Earhart were she not such a captivating, fascinating personality. Her talent, charisma and courage were matched by her joie de vivre, as well as her adventurous outlook. Earhart maintained that women had just as much right to adventure and achievement as men.

By her own admission, Amelia loved the limelight, but her publicity served a far more noble purpose than self aggrandizement; it carved out a path of opportunity for the women who came before and after her. She was well aware of this, and felt the responsibility that came with being a trailblazer.

MEET THE AUTHOR

Pauline T. is an experienced writer and a member of the Hyperink Team, which works hard to bring you high-quality, engaging, fun content. Happy reading!

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

Amelia Mary Earhart was born on July 24, 1897, in Atchison, Kansas. As the daughter of a prominent railroad attorney, Amelia spent her early years living in Midwestern railway towns such as including Kansas City and Des Moines. Growing up with her younger sister Muriel, Amelia was the tomboy of the family, climbing trees, belly slamming her sled down treacherous hills and even hunting rats with a .22 rifle. Another hobby for the young Amelia was collecting newspaper clippings about women who had succeeded in male dominated fields such as mechanical engineering, law and industry; these women became her early heroes.

Amelia's life of adventure began during World War I when she decided to leave school and help the war effort by tending wounded soldiers. After taking a Red Cross course, Amelia spent a year in Canada as a nurses' aid in a military hospital. This experience led her to enroll in the pre med program at New York's Columbia University. Her medical education ended when her parents asked her to join them in California.

Shortly after moving to California, Amelia revived an old interest her fascination with flight. During the First World War, she found herself captivated when a stunt pilot at an air show "buzzed" her and a friend, swooping low and then just missing them. As she said later, "I believe that little red airplane said something to me as it swished by."

CHAPTER OUTLINE

Biography of Amelia Earhart

+ Introduction

+ A Typical Midwest Girl

+ Fame and Achievements

+ The Final Flight

+ ...and much more

ABOUT THE BOOK

You're traveling through a small mountain town in Italy by yourself, and you're hopelessly lost. To make things worse, you accidentally left your money back in your lodgings and you don't speak a word of Italian. What should you do?

In this worthy-of-a-nightmare scenario, it's not about what you should do; it's about what you should have done before you even left home. Many travelers don't realize the importance of learning a few words and phrases in the primary language of the country they're going to.

This is especially important if you're backpacking, because chances are you'll be far removed from metropolitan tourist areas where you might be able to find a fellow American.

If you plan on backpacking through Italy, the most important thing you can put in your backpack is an English-Italian phrase book. You don't need a large dictionary; just a compact book that gives you the most important, day-to-day living phrases to help you get around.

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

Consonants: Hard And Soft Sounds

One "c" consonant is pronounced hard, like a "k."

Two "c" consonants together are always pronounced as "ch."

The consonant "g" is pronounced like a hard "g," unless it's in front of the vowels "i" or "e," when it's pronounced soft, like a "j."

There is no "w" in the Italian language; the "w" sound is indicated by the two vowels, "u" and "a," together.

"Sc" is pronounced like "sh" when it's followed by an "i" or an "e." Otherwise, "sc" is pronounced like "sk."

"Sch" is pronounced like "sk."

"Gh" is pronounced with a hard "g."

"Z" is pronounced "ts."

The "h" is silent in words like "ho" ("io ho" mean "I have")

When "n" follows a "g," the sound is "nyo" (as in the Italian word for bath, "bagno," which is pronounced "bah-nyo").

"S" between two vowels is pronounced "z."

Buy a copy to keep reading!

CHAPTER OUTLINE

250 Useful Italian Phrases while Backpacking

+ Introduction

+ Consonants: Hard and Soft Sounds

+ Vowels

+ Common Situations

+ ...and much more

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.