Globalisation and Equality

Routledge
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Is globalisation creating a more unequal world? Is it creating new forms of inequality? Does it make certain pre-existing forms of inequality more morally or politically significant than they would otherwise have been?
Globalisation and Equality examines these and related questions, exploring the way increasing globalisation is challenging our conceptions of equality. The contributors explore these themes from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. Some adopt a more abstract approach, exploring foundational questions concerning the meaning of equality, its social and political dimensions, and more specifically its moral implications in a global context. Others engage the general themes of globalisation and equality by focusing on specific topics, such as welfare, citizenship, gender, culture, and the environment.
Original in the questions it poses, and interdisciplinary in its approach, this collection of essays will appeal to all those with an interest in globalisation and equality.
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About the author

Keith Horton is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, Charles Sturt University, Australia. Haig Patapan is Senior Lecturer in the School of Politics and Public Policy, Griffith University, Australia.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Jul 31, 2004
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Pages
208
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ISBN
9781134342891
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / General
Political Science / History & Theory
Political Science / Political Economy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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The aim of this book is to conduct a critical survey of the main tools devised for the synthetic measurement of globalization processes. To this end, the first part of the book discusses the meaning of the concept considered, highlighting the different and often contradictory interpretations put forward in its regard in the literature. Subsequently analysed are the passages and issues that must be addressed when constructing an instrument intended to measure a social phenomenon of such complexity as globalization. Stressed in particular is that the researcher’s subjectivity is repeatedly involved in these passages, so that no instrument can have objective validity. Given these premises, the book presents the principal tools employed in attempts to measure globalization, starting with those whose unit of analysis is the state. In this regard, particular space is devoted to indexes which take a multidimensional approach to the concept of globalization. There follows a comparison among the results obtained using these indexes, and criticisms are made of the ways in which the latter have been constructed. A limitation, or if one wishes a paradox, concerning such tools is that they measure in relation to states a process which has as one of its principal features the fact that it extends beyond the confines of states. For this reason, the final chapter considers whether globalization can be measured with different units of analysis – in particular people and cities. The books concludes with discussion of the general limitations of globalization indexes.
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