The Web of Modularity: Arithmetic of the Coefficients of Modular Forms and Q-series, Issue 102

American Mathematical Soc.
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Modular forms appear in many ways in number theory. They play a central role in the theory of quadratic forms, in particular, as generating functions for the number of representations of integers by positive definite quadratic forms. They are also key players in the recent spectacular proof of Fermat's Last Theorem. Modular forms are at the center of an immense amount of current research activity. Also detailed in this volume are other roles that modular forms and $q$-series play in number theory, such as applications and connections to basic hypergeometric functions, Gaussian hypergeometric functions, super-congruences, Weierstrass points on modular curves, singular moduli, class numbers, $L$-values, and elliptic curves.The first three chapters provide some basic facts and results on modular forms, which set the stage for the advanced areas that are treated in the remainder of the book. Ono gives ample motivation on topics where modular forms play a role. Rather than cataloging all of the known results, he highlights those that give their flavor. At the end of most chapters, he gives open problems and questions. The book is an excellent resource for advanced graduate students and researchers interested in number theory.
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Additional Information

Publisher
American Mathematical Soc.
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Published on
Dec 31, 2004
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Pages
216
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ISBN
9780821833681
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Language
English
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Genres
Mathematics / General
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This content is DRM protected.
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Ken Ono
"The son of a prominent Japanese mathematician who came to the United States after World War II, Ken Ono was raised on a diet of high expectations and little praise. Rebelling against his pressure-cooker of a life, Ken determined to drop out of high school to follow his own path. To obtain his father’s approval, he invoked the biography of the famous Indian mathematical prodigy Srinivasa Ramanujan, whom his father revered, who had twice flunked out of college because of his single-minded devotion to mathematics.
Ono describes his rocky path through college and graduate school, interweaving Ramanujan’s story with his own and telling how at key moments, he was inspired by Ramanujan and guided by mentors who encouraged him to pursue his interest in exploring Ramanujan’s mathematical legacy.
Picking up where others left off, beginning with the great English mathematician G.H. Hardy, who brought Ramanujan to Cambridge in 1914, Ono has devoted his mathematical career to understanding how in his short life, Ramanujan was able to discover so many deep mathematical truths, which Ramanujan believed had been sent to him as visions from a Hindu goddess. And it was Ramanujan who was ultimately the source of reconciliation between Ono and his parents.
Ono’s search for Ramanujan ranges over three continents and crosses paths with mathematicians whose lives span the globe and the entire twentieth century and beyond. Along the way, Ken made many fascinating discoveries. The most important and surprising one of all was his own humanity."
Bruce C. Berndt
Scott D. Ahlgren
From July 31 through August 3,1997, the Pennsylvania State University hosted the Topics in Number Theory Conference. The conference was organized by Ken Ono and myself. By writing the preface, I am afforded the opportunity to express my gratitude to Ken for beng the inspiring and driving force behind the whole conference. Without his energy, enthusiasm and skill the entire event would never have occurred. We are extremely grateful to the sponsors of the conference: The National Sci ence Foundation, The Penn State Conference Center and the Penn State Depart ment of Mathematics. The object in this conference was to provide a variety of presentations giving a current picture of recent, significant work in number theory. There were eight plenary lectures: H. Darmon (McGill University), "Non-vanishing of L-functions and their derivatives modulo p. " A. Granville (University of Georgia), "Mean values of multiplicative functions. " C. Pomerance (University of Georgia), "Recent results in primality testing. " C. Skinner (Princeton University), "Deformations of Galois representations. " R. Stanley (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), "Some interesting hyperplane arrangements. " F. Rodriguez Villegas (Princeton University), "Modular Mahler measures. " T. Wooley (University of Michigan), "Diophantine problems in many variables: The role of additive number theory. " D. Zeilberger (Temple University), "Reverse engineering in combinatorics and number theory. " The papers in this volume provide an accurate picture of many of the topics presented at the conference including contributions from four of the plenary lectures.
Ken Ono
"The son of a prominent Japanese mathematician who came to the United States after World War II, Ken Ono was raised on a diet of high expectations and little praise. Rebelling against his pressure-cooker of a life, Ken determined to drop out of high school to follow his own path. To obtain his father’s approval, he invoked the biography of the famous Indian mathematical prodigy Srinivasa Ramanujan, whom his father revered, who had twice flunked out of college because of his single-minded devotion to mathematics.
Ono describes his rocky path through college and graduate school, interweaving Ramanujan’s story with his own and telling how at key moments, he was inspired by Ramanujan and guided by mentors who encouraged him to pursue his interest in exploring Ramanujan’s mathematical legacy.
Picking up where others left off, beginning with the great English mathematician G.H. Hardy, who brought Ramanujan to Cambridge in 1914, Ono has devoted his mathematical career to understanding how in his short life, Ramanujan was able to discover so many deep mathematical truths, which Ramanujan believed had been sent to him as visions from a Hindu goddess. And it was Ramanujan who was ultimately the source of reconciliation between Ono and his parents.
Ono’s search for Ramanujan ranges over three continents and crosses paths with mathematicians whose lives span the globe and the entire twentieth century and beyond. Along the way, Ken made many fascinating discoveries. The most important and surprising one of all was his own humanity."
Scott D. Ahlgren
From July 31 through August 3,1997, the Pennsylvania State University hosted the Topics in Number Theory Conference. The conference was organized by Ken Ono and myself. By writing the preface, I am afforded the opportunity to express my gratitude to Ken for beng the inspiring and driving force behind the whole conference. Without his energy, enthusiasm and skill the entire event would never have occurred. We are extremely grateful to the sponsors of the conference: The National Sci ence Foundation, The Penn State Conference Center and the Penn State Depart ment of Mathematics. The object in this conference was to provide a variety of presentations giving a current picture of recent, significant work in number theory. There were eight plenary lectures: H. Darmon (McGill University), "Non-vanishing of L-functions and their derivatives modulo p. " A. Granville (University of Georgia), "Mean values of multiplicative functions. " C. Pomerance (University of Georgia), "Recent results in primality testing. " C. Skinner (Princeton University), "Deformations of Galois representations. " R. Stanley (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), "Some interesting hyperplane arrangements. " F. Rodriguez Villegas (Princeton University), "Modular Mahler measures. " T. Wooley (University of Michigan), "Diophantine problems in many variables: The role of additive number theory. " D. Zeilberger (Temple University), "Reverse engineering in combinatorics and number theory. " The papers in this volume provide an accurate picture of many of the topics presented at the conference including contributions from four of the plenary lectures.
Bruce C. Berndt
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