Watertown, Wisconsin City Directory, 1889

Hometown Series

Book 12
Ken Riedl
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Reprint of Watertown, Wisconsin City Directory of 1889
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 Hometown Series of publications by Watertown Historical Society

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Publisher
Ken Riedl
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Published on
Jul 1, 2005
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Pages
180
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / State & Local / Midwest (IA, IL, IN, KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, OH, SD, WI)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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 Watertown RememberedPart of the Hometown Series of Publications of the Watertown Historical Society, Ken Riedl editor.

Reformatted and republished in 2010 in eBook format

CONTENTS: 
I The River
II The Trees
III The Indians
IV The Settlers (Yankees, Irish, Welsh, Bohemians, French)
V The Settlers (Germans)
VI The Story of Education in Watertown
VII Colorful Characters
VIII A House, a “House Divided,” and Watertown’s “Finest”
IX Music and Musicians, Books, Clubs and Newspapers
X Industries, Crafts, Services
XI Let Us Now Praise Famous Men;
Bibliography

In the year 1976, the nation's bicentennial year and the 140th year of Watertown's first settlement, an authentic history of Watertown, Wisconsin was published. Watertown Remembered is a rich composite of factual history seasoned with a charming array of anecdote and folklore. The capable blender and author of all this is E. C. Kiessling. 

Dr. Kiessling is a native son of Jefferson County and a long-time director of the Watertown Historical Society. He was a professor of history and English at Northwestern College for 46 years, and continues as a book reviewer for the Milwaukee Journal. 

Perhaps every community would like to boast of its heritage as worthy of written record, but from its river, which had somehow “overlooked something precious," through the amazing 48ers and others who came here by the thousands to make it the second biggest city in the state and the unforgettable characters who enlivened its past, to the solid, traditional town it is today, E. C. Kiessling has given us an especially vivid and indelible recollection for all to remember Watertown. 

Local history, Watertown, WI, Dodge County and Jefferson County.
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Pulitzer Prize–winning historian David McCullough rediscovers an important and dramatic chapter in the American story—the settling of the Northwest Territory by dauntless pioneers who overcame incredible hardships to build a community based on ideals that would come to define our country.

As part of the Treaty of Paris, in which Great Britain recognized the new United States of America, Britain ceded the land that comprised the immense Northwest Territory, a wilderness empire northwest of the Ohio River containing the future states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin. A Massachusetts minister named Manasseh Cutler was instrumental in opening this vast territory to veterans of the Revolutionary War and their families for settlement. Included in the Northwest Ordinance were three remarkable conditions: freedom of religion, free universal education, and most importantly, the prohibition of slavery. In 1788 the first band of pioneers set out from New England for the Northwest Territory under the leadership of Revolutionary War veteran General Rufus Putnam. They settled in what is now Marietta on the banks of the Ohio River.

McCullough tells the story through five major characters: Cutler and Putnam; Cutler’s son Ephraim; and two other men, one a carpenter turned architect, and the other a physician who became a prominent pioneer in American science. They and their families created a town in a primeval wilderness, while coping with such frontier realities as floods, fires, wolves and bears, no roads or bridges, no guarantees of any sort, all the while negotiating a contentious and sometimes hostile relationship with the native people. Like so many of McCullough’s subjects, they let no obstacle deter or defeat them.

Drawn in great part from a rare and all-but-unknown collection of diaries and letters by the key figures, The Pioneers is a uniquely American story of people whose ambition and courage led them to remarkable accomplishments. This is a revelatory and quintessentially American story, written with David McCullough’s signature narrative energy.
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