Native Peoples and Water Rights

McGill-Queen's Native and Northern Series

Book 55
McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
1
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Through a combination of field work and archival research, Kenichi Matsui offers an original and pioneering overview of the evolution of water law and agricultural policies in the Canadian west. By incorporating the history of water law philosophies, water development technologies, agricultural policies, and cross-cultural theories, Matsui constructs an interdisciplinary analysis of how both Native peoples and non-native stakeholders struggled for better rights and livelihood through litigation, political campaigns, and direct actions.
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About the author

Kenichi Matsui is assistant professor, sustainable environmental studies, University of Tsukuba.

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Additional Information

Publisher
McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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Published on
Dec 31, 2009
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Pages
264
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ISBN
9780773576582
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Native American
Law / General
Law / Indigenous Peoples
Law / Natural Resources
Political Science / Public Policy / Agriculture & Food Policy
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / Native American Studies
Technology & Engineering / Civil / Dams & Reservoirs
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Native Students at Work tells the stories of Native people from around the American Southwest who participated in labor programs at Sherman Institute, a federal Indian boarding school in Riverside, California. The school placed young Native men and women in and around Los Angeles as domestic workers, farmhands, and factory laborers. For the first time, historian Kevin Whalen reveals the challenges these students faced as they left their homes for boarding schools and then endured an “outing program” that aimed to strip them of their identities and cultures by sending them to live and work among non-Native people. Tracing their journeys, Whalen shows how male students faced low pay and grueling conditions on industrial farms near the edge of the city, yet still made more money than they could near their reservations. Similarly, many young women serving as domestic workers in Los Angeles made the best of their situations by tapping into the city’s Indigenous social networks and even enrolling in its public schools. As Whalen reveals, despite cruel working conditions, Native people used the outing program to their advantage whenever they could, forming urban indigenous communities and sharing money and knowledge gained in the city with those back home.

A mostly overlooked chapter in Native American and labor histories, Native Students at Work deepens our understanding of the boarding school experience and sheds further light on Native American participation in the workforce.

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