Just in Time! Easter Services, Sermons, and Prayers

Abingdon Press
Free sample

Based on the Revised Common Lectionary and broadly ecumenical, this addition to the Just In Time! series provides creative liturgies, sermon helps, and prayers for Easter Vigil, Easter Sunday, and the 40 days of Easter.
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About the author

Kenneth H. Carter is president of the Council of Bishops of The United Methodist Church and serves the Florida Conference area. He is the author of ten other books, including Pray for Me, A Way of Life in the World, The Gifted Pastor, and Near the Cross.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Abingdon Press
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Published on
Sep 1, 2010
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Pages
61
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ISBN
9781426728075
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Language
English
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Genres
Religion / Christian Rituals & Practice / Worship & Liturgy
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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By focusing on the sacrifice Jesus made on our behalf -- and powerfully linking it to our lives today -- this comprehensive resource offers a compelling approach to observing Lent that truly prepares worshipers to experience Easter's new hope, new possibilities, and new life. Based on the ancient tradition of the five wounds of Christ, Wounded For Us identifies places where we find ourselves hurting, then connects them to one of the wounds Jesus suffered and explores how Christ's resurrection offers reconciliation and healing. Wounded For Us draws an imaginative analogy between Jesus' wounds and these areas in our lives where we are wounded: * Head (crown of thorns) -- our thoughts * Side (piercing) -- our spirit and emotions * Back (scourging) -- our hopes and dreams * Hands (nails) -- our relationships * Feet (nails) -- our actions With sermon and worship material for Ash Wednesday, the Sundays in Lent, Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Easter Sunday, Wounded For Us provides a complete package with everything needed for developing meaningful, thematically unified services throughout the Lenten season. Each sermon suggests an action plan that applies the "cure" of the gospel to our wounds, and reproducible outlines that help the congregation focus on the main themes are also included. C. David Hogsett served several congregations in the North Indiana conference of the United Methodist Church during nearly four decades of active ministry. Hogsett holds degrees from Purdue University (B.S. in math), Southern Methodist University's Perkins School of Theology (B.D., S.T.M.), and McCormick Theological Seminary (D.Min.).
Drawing on the rich imagery of rocks and stones in scripture, these powerful messages center around the compelling metaphor of stones (and our willingness to throw them) as representative of our sins. As worshipers enter the sanctuary they are invited to pick up stones as a concrete symbol of each sermon's theme; then as the message concludes the stones are placed at the foot of the cross. When the stones disappear on Easter (just like the stone sealing Jesus' tomb), it's a vivid illustration of how the Lord also removes our stones of sin. Each chapter includes several thought-provoking discussion questions to spur further reflection. With messages for Ash Wednesday, five weeks of Lent, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Easter Sunday, this is an excellent resource for Lenten midweek programming. Molin takes us on a journey of prayerful and honest repentance -- a powerful and life-changing journey of celebration, of grace, of awe at the miracle of the empty tomb and the promise of life.... Pastor Molin is one of the best sermon story-tellers I've heard. But each sermon and every story also teaches a biblical text. These sermons are grounded in the living Word of God... (from the Foreword) Glenndy L. Sculley, Bishop's Associate Minneapolis Area Synod, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Steven Molin is the senior pastor of Our Savior's Lutheran Church (ELCA) in Stillwater, Minnesota. He has also served parishes in Oregon and South Dakota, and been an area director for the youth ministry organization Young Life. Molin is a graduate of Concordia University (St. Paul, Minnesota) and Luther Theological Seminary.
Embracing the Wideness contrasts a generous orthodoxy with the culture wars that seek to drive a wedge between Christians with deep faith convictions. A generous orthodoxy is possible for The United Methodist Church because scripture supports both a confessing movement and a reconciling movement.

In addition to our divergent understandings of holiness in The United Methodist Church, we apparently have two distinct conceptions of church. These two conceptions of church present in American Methodism grew from seeds planted in the earliest practice of British Methodism: A separatist church, which views holiness as a calling that separates us from the world—“come out from among them and be separated” (2 Corinthians 6:17). Here holiness is a quality that distinguishes Christians from the world. An activist church, which understands holiness as a movement for change in an unjust world. The boundaries between church and society are blurred, with the “wheat and tares” growing together (Matthew 13) until God’s final judgment.

At times, a denomination is able to hold these two conceptions of church in tension. And at times, as in recent experiences of American Christianity, there is fragmentation and division. The division may finally be the result of clearly articulated values that are not compatible. And the division may also be the result of how leaders do harm to each other.

What great things could be accomplished if we rediscovered orthodoxy in service of the healing, instead of dividing, of our bodies—our churches! Such a generous orthodoxy would help us not to become immersed in the emotional processes that pit people against each other. Such a generous orthodoxy would keep us from becoming stuck in cycles of harmful collusion and escalating conflict. Such a generous orthodoxy would know that the source of our capacity to be healed of our schisms is a miracle beyond our human power or goodness or intelligence.

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