Everything is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson

Fantagraphics Books
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What happened to Paul Nelson? In the '60s, he pioneered rock & roll criticism with a first-person style of writing that would later be popularized by the likes of Tom Wolfe and Norman Mailer as “New Journalism.” As co-founding editor of The Little Sandy Review and managing editor of Sing Out!, he’d already established himself, to use his friend Bob Dylan’s words, as “a folk-music scholar”; but when Dylan went electric in 1965, Nelson went with him. 
During a five-year detour at Mercury Records in the early 1970s, Nelson signed the New York Dolls to their first recording contract, then settled back down to writing criticism at Rolling Stone as the last in a great tradition of record-review editors that included Jon Landau, Dave Marsh, and Greil Marcus. Famously championing the early careers of artists like Bruce Springsteen, Jackson Browne, Rod Stewart, Neil Young, and Warren Zevon, Nelson not only wrote about them but often befriended them. Never one to be pigeonholed, he was also one of punk rock’s first stateside mainstream proponents, embracing the Sex Pistols and the Ramones. 

But in 1982, he walked away from it all — Rolling Stone, his friends, and rock & roll.  By the time he died in his New York City apartment in 2006 at the age of seventy — a week passing before anybody discovered his body — almost everything he’d written had been relegated to back issues of old music magazines. 

How could a man whose writing had been so highly regarded have fallen so quickly from our collective memory? With Paul Nelson’s posthumous blessing, Kevin Avery spent four years researching and writing Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writing of Paul Nelson. This unique anthology-biography compiles Nelson’s best works (some of it previously unpublished) while also providing a vivid account of his private and public lives. Avery interviewed almost 100 of Paul Nelson’s friends, family, and colleagues, including several of the artists about whom he’d written.
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About the author

Kevin Avery has published over 300 articles and short stories. His books include Everything Is an Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson and Conversations with Clint: Paul Nelson's Lost Interviews with Clint Eastwood, 1979 - 1983. He lives in Brooklyn, NY.

Born in Newark & schooled in his father's bar, Nick Tosches is one of the most original & individualistic writers at work today. He is the author of acclaimed biographies of Sonny Liston, (The Devil & Sonny Liston), Dean Martin (Dino), the Mafia financier Michele Sindona (Power on Earth), & Jerry Lee Lewis (Hellfire); of several books about popular music (Country & Unsung Heroes of Rock 'n' Roll); & of the novels "Trinities" & "Cut Numbers". Thirty years of his writing was recently collected into "The Nick Tosches Reader" (Da Capo). He is a contributing editor of "Vanity Fair". He lives in New York City, & his poetry readings are legend.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Fantagraphics Books
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Published on
Nov 21, 2011
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Pages
512
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ISBN
9781606994757
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Music / History & Criticism
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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