The Small Gulf States: Foreign and Security Policies before and after the Arab Spring

Routledge
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Small states are often believed to have been resigned to the margins of international politics. However, the recent increase in the number of small states has increased their influence and forced the international community to incorporate some of them into the global governance system. This is particularly evident in the Middle East where small Gulf states have played an important role in the changing dynamics of the region in the last decade.

The Small Gulf States

analyses the evolution of these states’ foreign and security policies since the Arab Spring. With particular focus on Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, it explores how these states have been successful in not only guaranteeing their survival, but also in increasing their influence in the region. It then discusses the security dilemmas small states face, and suggests a multitude of foreign and security policy options, ranging from autonomy to influence, in order to deal with this. The book also looks at the influence of regional and international actors on the policies of these countries. It concludes with a discussion of the peculiarities and contributions of the Gulf states for the study of small states’ foreign and security policies in general.

Providing a comprehensive and up-to-date analysis of the unique foreign and security policies of the states of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) before and after the Arab Spring, this book will be a valuable resource for students and scholars of Middle East studies, foreign policy and international relations.

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About the author

Khalid Almezaini is Lecturer at Qatar University and a Visiting Research Fellow at LSE. Prior to joining Qatar University, Almezaini taught Middle East Politics at the universities of Exeter, Edinburgh and Cambridge. His research interests range from international relations, Middle East politics and security to foreign aid and political economy.

Jean-Marc Rickli

is Lecturer at the Department of Defence Studies of King’s College London and at the Qatar Joint Command and Staff College in Doha. He is also an Associate Fellow of the Geneva Centre for Security Policy. His previous appointment includes Assistant Professor at the Institute for International and Civil Security at Khalifa University in Abu Dhabi.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Dec 8, 2016
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Pages
226
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ISBN
9781317214342
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / World / Middle Eastern
Social Science / Regional Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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