Mergers, Acquisitions and Global Empires: Tolerance, Diversity and the Success of M&A

Routledge
Free sample

Companies that have acquired other enterprises through mergers and acquisitions (M&A) have in essence become entities that are akin to the global "empires" of history. In this book, the author weaves a unique narrative that looks at both empires of business created from M&A and global empires from world history in an attempt to answer the question: why do certain empires endure for long periods while others collapse in a short space of time.

Empires formed from M&A or conquest have a hierarchical relationship of control and domination by a single authority or centre that can be described as a "parent company" or a "mother country" over another group of people based in a periphery that can be described as a "subsidiary company" or "colony." Given their similarities in development and structure, the author argues from looking at examples of empires in Western and Asian history as well as major M&A cases that long enduring empires created from M&A and global empires have a common cultural trait; their practice of "tolerance" within their organizations/societies.

While there are books on the topics of M&A and empires, at present there is no single text that examines the impact of culture on both. This book is intended to fill such a void and provide hints and suggestions to those practitioners of M&A as well as students of business and history who want an accessible, non-technical narrative on what makes empires, whether they are of the nation or of M&A endure and prosper.

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About the author

Ko Unoki has been involved with global marketing, corporate strategy formulation, and strategic alliances while working in the electronics and healthcare industries for several decades and was also a Senior Fellow at the 21st Century Public Policy Institute of the Federation of Japanese Economic Organizations (Keidanren). This is his first published book.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Oct 12, 2012
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9781136215384
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Economics / General
Business & Economics / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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