Travel & See: Black Diaspora Art Practices since the 1980s

Duke University Press
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Over the years, Kobena Mercer has critically illuminated the visual innovations of African American and black British artists. In Travel & See he presents a diasporic model of criticism that gives close attention to aesthetic strategies while tracing the shifting political and cultural contexts in which black visual art circulates. In eighteen essays, which cover the period from 1992 to 2012 and discuss such leading artists as Isaac Julien, Renée Green, Kerry James Marshall, and Yinka Shonibare, Mercer provides nothing less than a counternarrative of global contemporary art that reveals how the “dialogical principle” of cross-cultural interaction not only has transformed commonplace perceptions of blackness today but challenges us to rethink the entangled history of modernism as well.  
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About the author

Kobena Mercer is Professor of History of Art and African American Studies at Yale University. He is author of Welcome to the Jungle: New Positions in Black Cultural Studies, editor of Cosmopolitan Modernisms, among other titles, and an inaugural recipient of the 2006 Clark Prize for Excellence in Arts Writing. 
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Additional Information

Publisher
Duke University Press
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Published on
Apr 29, 2016
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Pages
384
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ISBN
9780822374510
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Language
English
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Genres
Art / African
Art / American / African American
Art / History / Contemporary (1945-)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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