Content Strategy for the Web: Edition 2

New Riders
3
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FROM CONSTANT CRISIS TO SUSTAINABLE SUCCESS

BETTER CONTENT MEANS BETTER BUSINESS. Your content is a mess: the website redesigns didn’t help, and the new CMS just made things worse. Or, maybe your content is full of potential: you know new revenue and cost-savings opportunities exist, but you’re not sure where to start. How can you realize the value of content while planning for its long-term success?

For organizations all over the world, Content Strategy for the Web is the go-to content strategy handbook. Read it to:
  • Understand content strategy and its business value
  • Discover the processes and people behind a successful content strategy
  • Make smarter, achievable decisions about what content to create and how
  • Find out how to build a business case for content strategy
With all-new chapters, updated material, case studies, and more, the second edition of Content Strategy for the Web is an essential guide for anyone who works with content.
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Additional Information

Publisher
New Riders
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Published on
Feb 28, 2012
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Pages
216
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ISBN
9780132883245
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Computers / Web / Design
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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