Migration from Food Contact Materials

Springer Science & Business Media
Free sample

The advent of sophisticated packaging materials and methods had stimulated the development of complex delivery systems from producer to consumer, resulting in the availability of a wide range of products at an affordable price. Contemporary distribution methods are not without problems however, and specifically related to packaging is the possibility of migration--the contamination of food by components of the materials in contact with it. In this area, both technology and regulations are well developed, but basic science, for a variety of reasons, has tended to advance less quickly. This book addresses the basic science of migration. The editor has brought together a range of authors, all of whom are acknowledged experts in their fields, to provide a timely and concise overview of this important topic. Covering basic science, common materials and the major regulations in North America, Europe and Japan, this book will become a key information source in every library concerned with food technology. Food technologists, manufacturers of packaging and other food contact materials and regulatory professionals will all find this book an indispensable reference source.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Dec 6, 2012
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9781461312253
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Language
English
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Genres
Technology & Engineering / Chemical & Biochemical
Technology & Engineering / Food Science
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Rice is one of the principal cereals used by the world's inhabitants. The hope for improved nourishment of the world's population depends on the development of better rice varieties and improved methods for rice production and utilization. During the past four decades, interest in rice research and production has increased in many countries. The development of new and better varieties by the International Rice Research Institute in the Philippines and other rice research institutes has stimulated numerous research stations to test the performance of these varieties in many countries under different climates, soil properties, cultural practices, and environmental conditions. The methods of harvesting, handling, drying, and milling rough rice have improved as a result of research efforts by the engineers and the rice milling industries. The first edition of Rice: Production and Utilization was published in 1980. This second edition presents the recent developments and progress made by the researchers, the industries, and various experiment stations. Because of the large amounts of literature available in recent years on rice production and utilization, this edition is divided into two volumes, Volume 1: Production and Volume II: Utilization. It is hoped that the books will be useful to rice researchers, processors, and people interested in rice production and utilization. Those studying v vi PREFACE the agronomy of rice plants, especially the genetics, breeding, cultivation, diseases, and insects that attack both the rice plant and the stored grain, will find this edition helpful in their search for new knowledge.
Since centuries foods have been preserved by heating, chilling, drying, salting, conserving, acidification, oxygen-removal, fermenting, adding various preservatives, etc., and often these methods were applied in combinations. More recently the underlying principles of these traditional methods have been defined (i.e., F, t, aw, pH, Eh, competitive flora, various preservatives), and effective limits of these factors for microbial growth, survival, and death were established. Food preservation and also food quality depends in most cases on the empirical and now more often on the deliberate and intelligent application of combined preservative factors, i.e. on so-called hurdle technology. It also became obvious that futuristic food preservation methods (e.g., high hydrostatic pressure, high-intensity pulsed electric fields, high-intensity pulsed light, oscillating magnetic fields as well as food irradiation) are most effective in combination with additional hurdles. Thus, hurdle technology is also the key of food preservation in the future. Furthermore, basic aspects of hurdle technology (i.e., homeostasis, metabolic exhaustion, and stress reactions of microorganisms as well as the multitarget preservation of foods) have been recognized to be of fundamental importance and are increasingly studied in relation to hurdle technology.
Different aspects of improvements of traditional foods and in the development of novel foods via hurdle technology have been covered recently in numerous articles and book chapters. However, Hurdle Technologies: Combination Treatments for Food Stability, Safety and Quality is the first work on hurdle technology in which all aspects, the possibilities and limitations of hurdle technology, are comprehensively outlined and evaluated. World-renowned on the subject, Leistner and Gould were instrumental in the development of the hurdle technology concept and in the last decades have obtained much practical experience in the application of this successful approach in the food industry worldwide.
Food and beverages can be very aggressive chemical milieu and may interact strongly with materials that they touch. Whenever food is placed in contact with another substance, there is a risk that chemicals from the contact material may migrate into the food. These chemicals may be harmful if ingested in large quantities, or impart a taint or odour to the food, negatively affecting food quality. Food packaging is the most obvious example of a food contact material. As the demand for pre-packaged foods increases, so might the potential risk to consumers from the release of chemicals into the food product. Chemical migration and food contact materials reviews the latest controls and research in this field and how they can be used to ensure that food is safe to eat.

Part one discusses the regulation and quality control of chemical migration into food. Part two reviews the latest developments in areas such as exposure estimation and analysis of food contact materials. The final part contains specific chapters on major food contact materials and packaging types, such as recycled plastics, metals, paper and board, multi-layer packaging and intelligent packaging.

With its distinguished editors and international team of authors, Chemical migration and food contact materials is an essential reference for scientists and professionals in food packaging manufacture and food processing, as well as all those concerned with assessing the safety of food.Reviews worldwide regulation of food contact materialsIncludes the latest developments in the analysis of food contact materialsLooks in detail at different food contact materials
The ?eld of sensory science has grown exponentially since the publication of the p- vious version of this work. Fifteen years ago the journal Food Quality and Preference was fairly new. Now it holds an eminent position as a venue for research on sensory test methods (among many other topics). Hundreds of articles relevant to sensory testing have appeared in that and in other journals such as the Journal of Sensory Studies. Knowledge of the intricate cellular processes in chemoreception, as well as their genetic basis, has undergone nothing less than a revolution, culminating in the award of the Nobel Prize to Buck and Axel in 2004 for their discovery of the olfactory receptor gene super family. Advances in statistical methodology have accelerated as well. Sensometrics meetings are now vigorous and well-attended annual events. Ideas like Thurstonian modeling were not widely embraced 15 years ago, but now seem to be part of the everyday thought process of many sensory scientists. And yet, some things stay the same. Sensory testing will always involve human participants. Humans are tough measuring instruments to work with. They come with varying degrees of acumen, training, experiences, differing genetic equipment, sensory capabilities, and of course, different preferences. Human foibles and their associated error variance will continue to place a limitation on sensory tests and actionable results. Reducing, controlling, partitioning, and explaining error variance are all at the heart of good test methods and practices.
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