All Our Children: The Church's Call to Address Education Inequity

Church Publishing, Inc.
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The church understands community as unity in diversity: Paul’s vision of the Body of Christ as a physical body, with all parts welcomed and honored as parts of the whole, is an image of community as revolutionary in our day as it was in first century Rome. And the church’s call to act in the world, to be Christ’s hands and heart for healing and reconciliation, hope and justice, gives it a unique role in the national movement to combat education inequity, a movement grounded in education research, community organizing, and community-based organizations. All Our Children offers a variety of stories witnessing the power of real partnerships between faith communities and public schools that create, nurture, and grow relationships, while transforming lives and communities, churches and schools, for healing, liberating action, and resurrection. The book highlights ways that judicatories and congregations are already providing direct service (after-school programs, tutoring, food backpacks), participating in community coalitions of care (with non-profit, higher education, and public service programs and staff), and joining state and regional advocacy campaigns for improved funding, policy, and accountability. Includes an executive summary and discussion guide written by diverse voices within the Episcopal Church, laying theological groundwork while showcasing examples of how partnership between church and school can lift up “education as forming humans” as one way to serve God’s mission in our neighborhoods. Contributors include, plus others: –The Rev. Ben Campbell—Micah Initiative in Richmond –The Rt. Rev. Andrew Waldo—South Carolina’s LARCUM Bishops’ Initiative –Louise Packard—Executive Director, Trinity Boston Foundation –The Rev. Liz Steinhauser—St. Stephen’s, Boston –Michael Sarbanes—Executive Director of Community Engagement, Baltimore –Mark R. Warren—Department of Public Policy and Public Affairs, UMass and Kennedy School fellow
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Additional Information

Publisher
Church Publishing, Inc.
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Published on
Apr 1, 2017
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Pages
176
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ISBN
9780819233486
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Language
English
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Genres
Religion / Ethics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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From the renowned and best-selling author of A History of God, a sweeping exploration of religion and the history of human violence.

For the first time, religious self-identification is on the decline in American. Some analysts have cited as cause a post-9/11perception: that faith in general is a source of aggression, intolerance, and divisiveness—something bad for society. But how accurate is that view? With deep learning and sympathetic understanding, Karen Armstrong sets out to discover the truth about religion and violence in each of the world’s great traditions, taking us on an astonishing journey from prehistoric times to the present.

While many historians have looked at violence in connection with particular religious manifestations (jihad in Islam or Christianity’s Crusades), Armstrong looks at each faith—not only Christianity and Islam, but also Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Judaism—in its totality over time. As she describes, each arose in an agrarian society with plenty powerful landowners brutalizing peasants while also warring among themselves over land, then the only real source of wealth. In this world, religion was not the discrete and personal matter it would become for us but rather something that permeated all aspects of society. And so it was that agrarian aggression, and the warrior ethos it begot, became bound up with observances of the sacred.

In each tradition, however, a counterbalance to the warrior code also developed. Around sages, prophets, and mystics there grew up communities protesting the injustice and bloodshed endemic to agrarian society, the violence to which religion had become heir. And so by the time the great confessional faiths came of age, all understood themselves as ultimately devoted to peace, equality, and reconciliation, whatever the acts of violence perpetrated in their name.

Industrialization and modernity have ushered in an epoch of spectacular and unexampled violence, although, as Armstrong explains, relatively little of it can be ascribed directly to religion. Nevertheless, she shows us how and in what measure religions, in their relative maturity, came to absorb modern belligerence—and what hope there might be for peace among believers of different creeds in our time.

At a moment of rising geopolitical chaos, the imperative of mutual understanding between nations and faith communities has never been more urgent, the dangers of action based on misunderstanding never greater. Informed by Armstrong’s sweeping erudition and personal commitment to the promotion of compassion, Fields of Blood makes vividly clear that religion is not the problem.
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