A Midwife's Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812

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WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE

Drawing on the diaries of one woman in eighteenth-century Maine, this intimate history illuminates the medical practices, household economies, religious rivalries, and sexual mores of the New England frontier.

Between 1785 and 1812 a midwife and healer named Martha Ballard kept a diary that recorded her arduous work (in 27 years she attended 816 births) as well as her domestic life in Hallowell, Maine. On the basis of that diary, Laurel Thatcher Ulrich gives us an intimate and densely imagined portrait, not only of the industrious and reticent Martha Ballard but of her society. At once lively and impeccably scholarly, A Midwife's Tale is a triumph of history on a human scale.


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Additional Information

Publisher
Vintage
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Published on
Dec 22, 2010
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Pages
464
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ISBN
9780307772985
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Women
History / United States / Revolutionary Period (1775-1800)
Social Science / Women's Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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