Othello: Language and Writing

A&C Black
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In this volume on Othello, Laurie Maguire examines the use and misuse of language, the play's textual and performance histories and how critics and directors have responded to the language of sexual jealousy.
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About the author

Laurie Maguire is Professor of English at Magdalen College, University of Oxford, UK.
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Additional Information

Publisher
A&C Black
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Published on
Apr 24, 2014
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Pages
232
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ISBN
9781408170670
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Language
English
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Genres
Drama / Shakespeare
Literary Criticism / Renaissance
Literary Criticism / Shakespeare
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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OXFORD SHAKESPEARE TOPICS General Editors: Peter Holland and Stanley Wells Oxford Shakespeare Topics provide students and teachers with short books on important aspects of Shakespeare criticism and scholarship. Each book is written by an authority in its field, and combines accessible style with original discussion of its subject. This book considers the impact and influence of Shakespeare on writing of the eighteenth century, and also how eighteenth-century Shakespeare scholarship influenced how we read Shakespeare today. The most influential English actor of the eighteenth century, David Garrick, could hail Shakespeare as 'the god of our idolatry', yet perform an adaptation of King Lear with a happy ending, add a dying speech to Macbeth, and remove the puns from Romeo and Juliet. Garrick's friend Samuel Johnson thought of Shakespeare as 'above all writers, at least above all modern writers, the poet of nature'. Voltaire thought he was a sublime genius without taste. The Bluestocking Elizabeth Montagu, meanwhile, could be found arguing with Johnson's biographer James Boswell over whether Shakespeare or Milton was the greater poet. Shakespeare and the Eighteenth Century traces the course of a many-faceted metamorphosis. Drawing on fresh research as well as the most recent scholarship in the field, it argues that the story of Shakespeare in the eighteenth century has become a significant 'subplot' in later scholarship, made up of great debates about how to read Shakespeare and how to rank him among the great English writers, how to perform his plays and how to edit the texts of those plays. This book surveys the critical and creative responses of actors and audiences, literary critics and textual editors, painters and philosophes to Shakespeare's works, while also suggesting how the Shakespeare of the theatre influenced the Shakespeare of the study, and how other, less straightforward interactions combined to bring about this sea-change in English cultural life. It speaks of the crucial role of Shakespeare in eighteenth-century culture, and the importance of that culture's absorption of Shakespeare for subsequent generations. This is a book about what the eighteenth century did to Shakespeare - and vice versa.
The Shakespearean World takes a global view of Shakespeare and his works, especially their afterlives. Constantly changing, the Shakespeare central to this volume has acquired an array of meanings over the past four centuries. "Shakespeare" signifies the historical person, as well as the plays and verse attributed to him. It also signifies the attitudes towards both author and works determined by their receptions. Throughout the book, specialists aim to situate Shakespeare’s world and what the world is because of him. In adopting a global perspective, the volume arranges thirty-six chapters in five parts:

Shakespeare on stage internationally since the late seventeenth century;

Shakespeare on film throughout the world;

Shakespeare in the arts beyond drama and performance;

Shakespeare in everyday life;

Shakespeare and critical practice.

Through its coverage, The Shakespearean World offers a comprehensive transhistorical and international view of the ways this Shakespeare has not only influenced but has also been influenced by diverse cultures during 400 years of performance, adaptation, criticism, and citation. While each chapter is a freshly conceived introduction to a significant topic, all of the chapters move beyond the level of survey, suggesting new directions in Shakespeare studies – such as ecology, tourism, and new media – and making substantial contributions to the field. This volume is an essential resource for all those studying Shakespeare, from beginners to advanced specialists.

The Oxford Handbook of Shakespearean Comedy offers critical and contemporary resources for studying Shakespeare's comic enterprises. It engages with perennial, yet still urgent questions raised by the comedies and looks at them from a range of new perspectives that represent the most recent methodological approaches to Shakespeare, genre, and early modern drama. Several chapters take up firmly established topics of inquiry such Shakespeare's source materials, gender and sexuality, hetero- and homoerotic desire, race, and religion, and they reformulate these topics in the materialist, formalist, phenomenological, or revisionist terms of current scholarship and critical debate. Others explore subjects that have only relatively recently become pressing concerns for sustained scholarly interrogation, such as ecology, cross-species interaction, and humoral theory. Some contributions, informed by increasingly sophisticated approaches to the material conditions and embodied experience of theatrical practice, speak to a resurgence of interest in performance, from Shakespeare's period through the first decades of the twenty-first century. Others still investigate distinct sets of plays from unexpected and often polemical angles, noting connections between the comedies under inventive, unpredicted banners such as the theology of adultery, early modern pedagogy, global exploration, or monarchical rule. The Handbook situates these approaches against the long history of criticism and provides a valuable overview of the most up-to-date work in the field.
Cannibalism, severed hands and severed heads, rape, murder, tragedy and – of course – the Classics. These are a few of the delights audiences have to look forward to in Titus Andronicus. It’s a play of extremes, as likely to provoke severe discomfort as severe delight. Titus has claimed its fair share of critical attention. In particular, its florid violence and the striking, tragic figure of Lavinia have proven a potent touchstone of modern Shakespearean criticism. But, for critics, the play is often just that: a touchstone, a way station to bigger and better things. In it, critics find portents of Lear in intransigent Titus or premonitions of Richard and Iago in Aaron. We believe, however, that Titus deserves a more sustained and eclectic analysis. This collection – the first full length work devoted to Titus in a decade – does just that.

Rather than seeking a unifying vision in the play, Titus out of Joint: Reading the Fragmented Titus Andronicus approaches the play as inherently dissonant, a text that draws our attention directly to how it pulls apart rather than coheres. The essays in this volume examine Titus from a wide variety of theoretical and critical perspectives including: disability studies, history of the book, psychoanalysis, gender studies, and theater history. A conversation emerges in these pages between these different and often contrasting approaches to the play, a conversation that the editors hope will continue outside the covers of this collection.

"Turns A BRILLIANT LIGHT on one of the lustiest and one of the most dramatic periods of English history."—Philadelphia Inquirer

The mesmerizing story of Anne of Cleves, fourth wife of Henry VIII, one of the rare women who matched wits successfully with the fiery king and lived to tell the tale.

Aware of the disastrous consequences of not bearing an heir, Anne of Cleves bravely took on the duty of weathering the Tudor King's temper and won the hearts of his subjects in the process.

Written by world-renowned historical novelist Margaret Campbell Barnes, My Lady of Cleves gives readers an intimate portrait of the warm, unpretentious princess who never expected to become Queen of England and how she navigated a world of high drama and courtly elegance.

A refreshing historical fiction about infamous Tudor England, fans of Philippa Gregory, Anya Seton and Bernard Cornwell will delight in this tale of Henry's fourth Queen, her secret love, her power-hungry husband, and the country that ruled them all.

Praise for My Lady of Cleves:
"At long last Anne of Cleves gets her day as a noble and highminded heroine in the lists of historical fiction!" — Chicago Tribune
"Barnes' vision of Anne is so different from others I have encountered, it was like reading her story for the first time. This is the Anne of Cleves I choose to live in my memory." —Books N Border Collies
"an appealing story of a woman who makes the best of a bad situation... it's nice to see this novel in particular being reissued." —Reading, Ranting, and Raving
"I have to say that from the moment I read the inscription, I was hooked in this book... Anne is brought to life, and is portrayed as a capable woman..." —Historical Tapestry

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