Crossing the Horizon: A Novel

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Soar back to the fearless 1920s with #1 New York Times bestselling writer Laurie Notaro—beloved author of The Idiot Girls’ Action Adventure Club—in a “captivating historical” (Kirkus Reviews) novel that tells the true, little-known story of three aviatrixes in a race to be the first woman to fly across the Atlantic.

It’s 1927.

Charles Lindberg has inspired millions but no woman has yet embarked on trans-Atlantic flight. Three women, based on real aviatrixes from the early years of aviation, determine to make their mark on history and set out on a thrilling but dangerous mission.

Elsie Mackay, daughter of an Earl, is the first Englishwoman to get her pilot’s license. Mabel Boll, a glamorous society darling and former cigar girl, is ardent to make the historic flight. Beauty pageant contestant Ruth Elder uses her winnings for flying lessons and becomes the preeminent American girl of the sky.

Inspired by true events and real people, Notaro vividly evokes this exciting time as her determined heroines vie for the record. Through striking photos, meticulous research, and atmospheric prose, Notaro brings Elsie, Mabel, and Ruth to life, pulling us back in time as the pilots collide, struggle, and literally crash in the chase for fame and a place in aviation history.
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About the author

Laurie Notaro was a reporter and a daily columnist at the metro daily The Arizona Republic before publishing twelve books of fiction and non-fiction with Random House and Simon and Schuster, several of which have been New York Times bestsellers. Her work covers the genres of humor, women’s fiction, historical fiction, and literary fiction. She was a finalist for the Thurber Prize, and has been awarded the Hearst Award, the Golden Circle Award, and several awards from the Society of Professional Journalists. She lives in Eugene, Oregon.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Simon and Schuster
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Published on
Oct 4, 2016
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Pages
464
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ISBN
9781451659429
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Action & Adventure
Fiction / Biographical
Fiction / Historical / General
Fiction / Women
Humor / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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