The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law

OUP Oxford
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This book provides a state-of-the-art account of past and current research in the interface between linguistics and law. It outlines the range of legal areas in which linguistics plays an increasing role and describes the tools and approaches used by linguists and lawyers in this vibrant new field. Through a combination of overview chapters, case studies, and theoretical descriptions, the volume addresses areas such as the history and structure of legal languages, its meaning and interpretation, multilingualism and language rights, courtroom discourse, forensic identification, intellectual property and linguistics, and legal translation and interpretation. Encyclopedic in scope, the handbook includes chapters written by experts from every continent who are familiar with linguistic issues that arise in diverse legal systems, including both civil and common law jurisdictions, mixed systems like that of China, and the emerging law of the European Union.
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About the author

Peter Tiersma was the Hon. William Matthew Bryne Professor of Law at Loyola Law School of Los Angeles from 2009 until his death in 2014. He had a Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of California, San Diego, and a J.D. degree from the University of California, Berkeley. His books include Legal Language (1999) and Parchment, Paper, Pixels: Law and the Technologies of Communication (2010). Lawrence Solan is the Don Forchelli Professor of Law and the Director of the Center for the Study of Law, Language and Cognition at Brooklyn Law School. He is on the editorial board of The International Journal of Speech, Language and the Law and the author of Language and Judges (1993).
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Additional Information

Publisher
OUP Oxford
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Published on
Mar 8, 2012
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Pages
664
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ISBN
9780191638107
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Linguistics / General
Law / General
Psychology / General
Social Science / Sociology / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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The aim of this book is to provide the student of Japanese with a simple method for correlating the writing and the meaning of Japanese characters in such a way as to make them both easy to remember. It is intended not only for the beginner, but also for the more advanced student looking for some relief from the constant frustration of how to write the kanji and some way to systematize what he or she already knows. The author begins with writing because--contrary to first impressions--it is in fact the simpler of the two. He abandons the traditional method of ordering the kanji according to their frequency of use and organizes them according to their component parts or "primitive elements." Assigning each of these parts a distinct meaning with its own distinct image, the student is led to harness the powers of "imaginative memory" to learn the various combinations that result. In addition, each kanji is given its own key word to represent the meaning, or one of the principal meanings, of that character. These key words provide the setting for a particular kanji's "story," whose protagonists are the primitive elements. In this way, students are able to complete in a few short months a task that would otherwise take years. Armed with the same skills as Chinese or Korean students, who know the meaning and writing of the kanji but not their pronunciation in Japanese, they are now in a much better position to learn to read (which is treated in a separate volume). For further information and a sample of the contents, visit http: ///www.nanzan-u.ac.jp/SHUBUNKEN/publications/miscPublications/Remembering_the_Kanji_l.htm.
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