Mack The Life

Random House
45
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Have you ever wondered where comedians come from? Why is it that one person is a funny bloke down the pub while another actually makes a living by standing up in front of an audience telling jokes? And where does all that material come from? Well, young Lee McKillop used to wonder that too.

Growing up in his parents’ pub, small and wiry in a world of bigger and chunkier specimens, Lee quickly learned that cracking jokes was a way to get attention. After a somewhat random series of jobs, which included being Red Rum’s stableboy and a bingo hall barman, it was as a Great Yarmouth holiday camp entertainer that he had his first crack at telling jokes on stage. It got him some laughs, the sack and a punch in the face.*

Now, as Lee Mack, he’s one of our best loved and most successful comedians, both as a live stand-up and on television. In Mack the Life, Lee tells the story of how he got there and gives extraordinary insight into what really makes comics tick. Hilarious and brilliant, it’s the kind of book which reminds you why you learned to read in the first place.

*Nearly.

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About the author

BAFTA-award-winning Lee Mack is one of the UK's most recognizable and celebrated comedians. He writes and stars in his own multi-award-winning sitcom Not Going Out, is a team captain on Would I Lie to You?, and frequently appears on Have I Got News for You, Live at the Apollo and QI. He has performed many stand-up tours across the country, and has released two stand-up DVDs, Lee Mack Live and Lee Mack – Going Out.

Lee lives in London with his wife, Tara, and their three children.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Random House
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Published on
Sep 27, 2012
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Pages
416
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ISBN
9781446488768
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Entertainment & Performing Arts
Humor / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

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A book has a spine that holds it together. Kevin Hart has a spine that holds him together.

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From the Trade Paperback edition.
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With a new bonus chapter

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