Double Wide

Brash Books, LLC
10
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After fastball phenom Prospero Stark’s baseball career craters in a Mexican jail, he retreats to a trailer park in the scorching Arizona desert. He lives in peaceful anonymity with a collection of colorful outcasts until someone leaves his former catcher’s severed hand on his doorstep. Beautiful, hard-living reporter Roxanne Santa Cruz, who keeps a .380 Colt and a bottle of Chivas in her car, joins Stark to help him uncover his friend’s fate, a dangerous pursuit that pits them against a ruthless gang of drug-dealing killers. 
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About the author

Leo W. Banks graduated from Boston College and earned a masters degree from the University of Arizona, where he later taught writing. He has written four books of Old West history for Arizona Highways publishing and co-wrote a book about the Grand Canyon. Today, Banks writes a column for True West magazine. Double Wide is his first novel. 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Brash Books, LLC
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Published on
Nov 1, 2017
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Pages
279
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ISBN
9780997832341
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Language
English
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Genres
FICTION / Mystery & Detective / Hard-Boiled
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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"Call me Fortunato. You won't be the first." 

So begins Amontillado, a unique tale of lust, infidelity, and murder. From rainy street corners to candlelit bookstores to hidden tunnels deep below a nameless city, you'll be transported to a surreal world in which motives are mysterious, intentions are unclear, emotions wreak havoc, and one person's desire for adventure will lead everyone down a dangerous path. 

Jacob Lyons is a writer, a drunk, and a bad husband, but he is no murderer. After an unfortunate encounter on a thunderous street corner, he finds himself surrounded by hostile detectives accusing him of being exactly that. 

Daniel Jefferson is Jacob's only friend. Despite problems of his own, he is determined to help Jacob overcome the downward spiral of a crumbling life, but he can't foresee the trouble that awaits. 

Breeana is a book lover who escapes her tired marriage by attending literary discussions and book club gatherings. One stormy night, when the electricity fails and her group discusses The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe, she meets an intriguing newcomer who ignites her passions and offers the adventure she desires. 

That intriguing newcomer is the witty and mysterious Marcus McComber, a man with a dark past and darker intentions. He will tell the tale of his romantic conquests to the fellow who sits beside him every night at the local tavern: the writer, the drunk, the accused murderer named Jacob Lyons. 

Amontillado is a circular experiment in repressed desire, unrequited love, uncontrollable passion, and the need for control, all mixed with the inexplicable evils of human nature that each can inspire. In the macabre tradition of Edgar Allan Poe himself, the story propels itself to a stunning conclusion, begging you to answer one simple question: 

Who kills who?


In Singlewide, Sonya Salamon and Katherine MacTavish explore the role of the trailer park as a source of affordable housing. America’s trailer parks, most in rural places, shelter an estimated 12 million people, and the authors show how these parks serve as a private solution to a pressing public need. Singlewide considers the circumstances of families with school-age children in trailer parks serving whites in Illinois, Hispanics in New Mexico, and African Americans in North Carolina. By looking carefully at the daily lives of families who live side by side in rows of manufactured homes, Salamon and MacTavish draw conclusions about the importance of housing, community, and location in the families’ dreams of opportunities and success as signified by eventually owning land and a conventional home.

Working-poor rural families who engage with what Salamon and MacTavish call the "mobile home industrial complex" may become caught in an expensive trap starting with their purchase of a mobile home. A family that must site its trailer in a land-lease trailer park struggles to realize any of the anticipated benefits of homeownership. Seeking to break down stereotypes, Salamon and MacTavish reveal the important place that trailer parks hold within the United States national experience. In so doing, they attempt to integrate and normalize a way of life that many see as outside the mainstream, suggesting that families who live in trailer parks, rather than being "trailer trash," culturally resemble the parks’ neighbors who live in conventional homes.

Gustav Stickley (1858–1942) was one of the leading lights of the Arts and Crafts movement in America, an organized effort which sought beauty in simple organic design. His magazine, The Craftsman, was a major forum for the movement's ideas and concepts ― ideas which today are enjoying a renaissance in the design community.
The present publication features 36 articles that appeared in The Craftsman between 1903 and 1916. Included are graphic descriptions of 59 "bungalows" (Most of which were actually spacious, year-round homes), floor plans for 35 dwellings, and many sketches or photographs of houses in landscaped settings.  
Characterized by its functional simplicity and integrated with the outdoor environment, the Craftsman home was typically composed of locally obtainable materials. A few of the most modest homes ― according to the magazine ― could even be constructed by persons with a minimum of masonry and carpentry experience. Interiors reflected the simple lines of the exteriors and generally included an ample fireplace (often of fieldstone construction), fireside benches, built-in bookcases and sideboards, plus walls, floors, and ceiling beams decorated ― preferably ― in colors that would harmonize with the structure's natural surroundings.
This inexpensive volume of selected Craftsman articles provides collectors of Americana with a fascinating glimpse of an influential and thoroughly American style of architectural design and construction. Craftsman Bungalows will be welcomed as a primary source of information and ideas by architects, students, and historians of architecture, preservationists, restorers ― anyone interested in the Arts and Crafts movement in America.
Dover (1988) republication of 36 articles from The Craftsman magazine, 1903–1916.
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