THE WILDER SHORES OF LOVE: THE STORIES OF FOUR NINETEENTH-CENTURY WOMEN WHO TRAVELED EAST

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Originally published in 1954, The Wilder Shores of Love pioneered a new kind of group biography focusing on four nineteenth-century European women "escaping the boredom of convention". They leave behind them the industrialized West for the Middle East, to find love, fulfillment, and "glowing horizons of emotion and daring".

Isabel Burton (who married the Arabist and explorer Richard), Jane Digby el-Mezrab (Lady Ellenborough, the society beauty who ended up living in the Syrian desert with a Bedouin chieftain), Aimee Dubucq de Rivery (a French convent girl captured by pirates who was gifted to the Sultan’s harem in Istanbul), and Isabelle Eberhardt (a Swiss-Russian linguist who felt most comfortable in boy’s clothes and lived among the Arabs in the Sahara).

Lesley Blanch felt the greatest affinity with Jane Digby, the society beauty who ended up living in the Syrian desert with a Bedouin chieftain: "She had a superb home in Damascus, was uninhibited, rode through life jumping all the fences, social and moral." 

A scholarly romantic, Lesley Blanch influenced and inspired generations of writers, readers and critics. The Wilder Shores of Love has remained in print in English since it was first published, and is considered to be an excellent example of the genre narrative non-fiction. 

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About the author

Lesley Blanch was a distinguished writer, artist, drama critic, and features editor of British Vogue during World War II. The author of twelve books, including Journey into the Mind's Eye, The Sabres of Paradise: Conquest and Vengeance in the Caucasus, Around the World in 80 Dishes, Pierre Loti, Pavilions of the Heart and The Nine Tiger Man, she died in 2007, age 103. Her memoirs On the Wilder Shores of Love: A Bohemian Life are published by Virago. To learn more about Lesley, visit her website at lesleyblanch.com

 

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Publisher
BookBlast ePublishing
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Published on
Mar 11, 2015
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Pages
336
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ISBN
9780993092794
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Historical
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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