Fairly Equal: Lawyering the Feminist Revolution

Second Story Press
Free sample

An eyewitness account of the revolution in women’s rights under the law.
 

Lawyer, activist, and former Chatelaine legal columnist Linda Silver Dranoff details her own trailblazing journey from a traditional 1950s childhood to the battlegrounds of the courts of law and the halls of power where she and a generation of women lawyers, supporting a larger feminist movement, championed the rights of Canadian women and families. Through a combination of memoir and social history, Dranoff brings to life the struggles around family law, pay and employment equity, violence against women, abortion rights, childcare, pension rights, political engagement, public policy, and access to legal justice.
 

From backroom battles to public and private protest, the stories are inspiring. Fairly Equal reminds us of the importance of remaining vigilant about our rights. Knowing what Dranoff’s generation of women lawyers and activists achieved, and how easily it can be taken away, we are encouraged in sisterhood and solidarity to ensure that the many hard-won gains of the feminist movement are maintained and expanded for the women who follow.

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About the author

Linda Silver Dranoff, C.M., LSM is a lawyer, writer, and activist. As a lawyer she appeared at every level of court in a precedent-setting 38-year career. She had a 25-year stint as a columnist at Chatelaine and is the author of Every Canadian’s Guide to the Law. She has been an activist for the Family Law Act, appointed to the Order of Canada, and honored many times including a Governor General's Award in Commemoration of the Persons Case. She lives in Toronto.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Second Story Press
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Published on
Apr 13, 2017
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Pages
376
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ISBN
9781772600230
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / Aviation
Social Science / Feminism & Feminist Theory
Social Science / Women's Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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 Anne S Walker grew up in the dormitories of a boarding school in the suburbs of Melbourne. Her initial career was as an early childhood teacher, then she sailed to England and worked as a community activist in London. Accepting an offer to work in Fiji, she became deeply involved for 11 years in early childhood education, women’s human rights, and public affairs advocacy, including the fight against nuclear testing in the Pacific.

Those years led her to undertake graduate study in development communications in the USA, following which she was asked to help establish the International Women’s Tribune Centre in New York. This thrust her into the centre of a global campaign for women’s human rights that spanned the next three decades.

From the IWTC headquarters opposite the United Nations, Anne and her colleagues met and worked alongside women from every world region on issues affecting their lives and the lives of their communities. Anne and the IWTC were involved in the historic series of UN world conferences on women held in various countries from 1975 to 1995.

As well as writing of her work and the role of the IWTC in those momentous decades, Anne tells the powerful stories of some of the women she met at meetings, workshops and other events in Africa, Asia, the Pacific, the Caribbean and Latin America. She also tells of witnessing and living through some of the toughest times in New York’s history, from the moments when planes crashed into the World Trade Centre towers on September 11, 2001.

This is an important memoir that takes readers inside the world of women fighting for justice and for an equal place at the tables where global policies and programs are developed and implemented.


From one of the fiercest critics writing today, Morgan Jerkins’ highly-anticipated collection of linked essays interweaves her incisive commentary on pop culture, feminism, black history, misogyny, and racism with her own experiences to confront the very real challenges of being a black woman today—perfect for fans of Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminist, Rebecca Solnit’s Men Explain Things to Me, and Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie’s We Should All Be Feminists.

Morgan Jerkins is only in her twenties, but she has already established herself as an insightful, brutally honest writer who isn’t afraid of tackling tough, controversial subjects. In This Will Be My Undoing, she takes on perhaps one of the most provocative contemporary topics: What does it mean to “be”—to live as, to exist as—a black woman today? This is a book about black women, but it’s necessary reading for all Americans.

Doubly disenfranchised by race and gender, often deprived of a place within the mostly white mainstream feminist movement, black women are objectified, silenced, and marginalized with devastating consequences, in ways both obvious and subtle, that are rarely acknowledged in our country’s larger discussion about inequality. In This Will Be My Undoing, Jerkins becomes both narrator and subject to expose the social, cultural, and historical story of black female oppression that influences the black community as well as the white, male-dominated world at large.

Whether she’s writing about Sailor Moon; Rachel Dolezal; the stigma of therapy; her complex relationship with her own physical body; the pain of dating when men say they don’t “see color”; being a black visitor in Russia; the specter of “the fast-tailed girl” and the paradox of black female sexuality; or disabled black women in the context of the “Black Girl Magic” movement, Jerkins is compelling and revelatory.

 

“However you define feminism, read this book . . . Race, privilege, gender, sexuality; the work to be done, your invitation to the conversation, is here” (Karen Walton, screenwriter of Orphan Black).
 
In a world where sexual harassment allegations regularly dominate news coverage and in which fifty-three percent of white women voted for Donald Trump, F-Bomb presents an urgent and necessary discussion on women’s lives today.
 
Everywhere we turn, there’s evidence anti-feminist bombs have exploded, sometimes detonated by the unlikeliest suspects. Between women who say they don’t need feminism and women who can’t agree on what feminism should be, the challenges of fighting for gender equality have never been greater.
 
F-Bomb takes readers on a witty, insightful, and deeply fascinating journey into today’s anti-feminist universe as investigative journalist and feminist Lauren McKeon explores generational attitudes, debates over inclusiveness, and differing views on the intersection of race, class, and gender. She asks the uncomfortable question: If women aren’t connecting with feminism, what’s wrong with it? And she confronts the difficult truth: For gender equality to prevail, we first need to understand where feminism has gone wrong and where it can go from here.
 
This book is not authorized by and has no relationship to the Women’s Media Center FBomb, an inclusive feminist blog that has been publishing since 2009. See www.womensmediacenter.com/fbomb.
 
“A much-needed commentary that will both anger and inspire you.” —Rachel Ricketts, activist, speaker, and writer
 
“The antidote to feeling at a loss for examples of why intersectional feminism is so very urgently needed now . . . McKeon has written a necessary call to action.” —Erin Wunker, author, Notes from a Feminist Killjoy
An Emma Watson "Our Shared Shelf" Selection for November/December 2018 • NAMED A BEST BOOK OF 2018/ MENTIONED BY: The New York Public Library • Mashable • The Atlantic • Bustle • The Root • Politico Magazine ("What the 2020 Candidates Are Reading This Summer") • NPR • Fast Company ("10 Best Books for Battling Your Sexist Workplace") • The Guardian ("Top 10 Books About Angry Women")


Rebecca Solnit, The New Republic: "Funny, wrenching, pithy, and pointed."

Roxane Gay: "I encourage you to check out Eloquent Rage out now."

Joy Reid, Cosmopolitan: "A dissertation on black women’s pain and possibility."

America Ferrera: "Razor sharp and hilarious. There is so much about her analysis that I relate to and grapple with on a daily basis as a Latina feminist."

Damon Young: "Like watching the world’s best Baptist preacher but with sermons about intersectionality and Beyoncé instead of Ecclesiastes."

Melissa Harris Perry: “I was waiting for an author who wouldn’t forget, ignore, or erase us black girls...I was waiting and she has come in Brittney Cooper.”

Michael Eric Dyson: “Cooper may be the boldest young feminist writing today...and she will make you laugh out loud.”

So what if it’s true that Black women are mad as hell? They have the right to be. In the Black feminist tradition of Audre Lorde, Brittney Cooper reminds us that anger is a powerful source of energy that can give us the strength to keep on fighting.

Far too often, Black women’s anger has been caricatured into an ugly and destructive force that threatens the civility and social fabric of American democracy. But Cooper shows us that there is more to the story than that. Black women’s eloquent rage is what makes Serena Williams such a powerful tennis player. It’s what makes Beyoncé’s girl power anthems resonate so hard. It’s what makes Michelle Obama an icon.

Eloquent rage keeps us all honest and accountable. It reminds women that they don’t have to settle for less. When Cooper learned of her grandmother's eloquent rage about love, sex, and marriage in an epic and hilarious front-porch confrontation, her life was changed. And it took another intervention, this time staged by one of her homegirls, to turn Brittney into the fierce feminist she is today. In Brittney Cooper’s world, neither mean girls nor fuckboys ever win. But homegirls emerge as heroes. This book argues that ultimately feminism, friendship, and faith in one's own superpowers are all we really need to turn things right side up again.

A BEST/MOST ANTICIPATED BOOK OF 2018 BY: Glamour • Chicago Reader • Bustle • Autostraddle

“To build a world that works for everyone, we must first make the radical decision to love every facet of ourselves…‘The body is not an apology' is the mantra we should all embrace.”
—Kimberlé Crenshaw, legal scholar and founder and Executive Director, African American Policy Forum

“Taylor invites us to break up with shame, to deepen our literacy, and to liberate our practice of celebrating every body and never apologizing for this body that is mine and takes care of me so well.”
—Alicia Garza, cocreator of the Black Lives Matter Global Network and Strategy + Partnerships Director, National Domestic Workers Alliance

“Her manifesto on radical self-love is life altering—required reading for anyone who struggles with body image.”
—Claire Foster, Foreword Review

Humans are a varied and divergent bunch with all manner of beliefs, morals, and bodies. Systems of oppression thrive off our inability to make peace with difference and injure the relationship we have with our own bodies.

The Body Is Not an Apology offers radical self-love as the balm to heal the wounds inflicted by these violent systems. World-renowned activist and poet Sonya Renee Taylor invites us to reconnect with the radical origins of our minds and bodies and celebrate our collective, enduring strength. As we awaken to our own indoctrinated body shame, we feel inspired to awaken others and to interrupt the systems that perpetuate body shame and oppression against all bodies. When we act from this truth on a global scale, we usher in the transformative opportunity of radical self-love, which is the opportunity for a more just, equitable, and compassionate world—for us all.
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