Kelly's Cabin

Orca Book Publishers
Free sample

Kelly loves the cabin she has made from a refrigerator box. It has a window with curtains, pictures on the walls, a cabin-sized table and a wonderful view. It sits in the vacant lot next door, transformed into the rugged farm of a pioneer family. Now if only Kelly can find the right person to share it with.
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About the author

Linda Smith loved Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little House books when she was growing up on the prairies, and regularly pretended that she was a pioneer.

Zorica Krasulja is a Canadian artist and illustrator from Burlington, Ontario. Visit her website at www.zorica.ca .

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Additional Information

Publisher
Orca Book Publishers
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Published on
Mar 31, 2006
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Pages
62
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ISBN
9781551434087
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Juvenile Fiction / Animals / Dogs
Juvenile Fiction / Social Issues / Emotions & Feelings
Juvenile Fiction / Social Issues / Friendship
Juvenile Fiction / Social Themes / Emotions & Feelings
Juvenile Fiction / Social Themes / Friendship
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Fifteen-year-old Alina comes from a long line of women who have gone to serve on the Isle of the Weavers, and she has always dreamed of doing the same. Her older sister is going to inherit the farm. She hasn’t found any boy in the village that she’s attracted to, like her other sister. And she loves her 10-year-old brother, but he’s getting to be a pain to look after all the time. Still, a girl must be chosen to be a weaver, and Alina’s already older than others were when they were called. Then the weavers come. Her dreams come true, and she’s taken to the Isle of Weaving, where the destiny of the world is born. Alina enters a long period of mental/spiritual training to prepare her to be a weaver. But she struggles with her trademark impatience. To the amusement of her trainers, she’s anxious to begin weaving after only a few months training. Then Alina is asked to take spools of thread to the weaving room, and she gets her first glimpse of the awesome tapestry, with its multitude of threads, and colours, and shifting patterns. Left alone for a minute, she discovers a red thread – red like her own hair – which is short and broken, and she impulsively takes a strand of her hair and ties the red thread to a tawny thread nearby. Immediately, thousands of other threads in the tapestry break. What has she done? The tapestry reflects what goes on in the world, as well as affecting events. By reconnecting a thread that was meant to be broken, she has caused the end of thousands of other threads/lives. She must undo what she has done and the story begins. Get lost in a magical time where adventure and danger abound and the strength of our heroine, Alina, is put to the test.
The beloved coming-of-age novel from the author whose “name has long been synonymous with young adult fiction” (Los Angeles Times).
 
“Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret is very special.” —Amy Poehler quoted on Vulture.com
 
“Generations of teenage girls have grown up reading the tales of teenage angst told by beloved author Judy Blume.” —Mashable.com
 
Margaret Simon, almost twelve, has just moved from New York City to the suburbs, and she’s anxious to fit in with her new friends. When she’s asked to join a secret club she jumps at the chance. But when the girls start talking about boys, bras, and getting their first periods, Margaret starts to wonder if she’s normal. There are some things about growing up that are hard for her to talk about, even with her friends. Lucky for Margaret, she’s got someone else to confide in . . . someone who always listens.
 
“The first Judy Blume books I read. . . served as a kind of introduction to myself.” —John Green quoted in The New York Times
 
“Mention Judy Blume to almost any woman under a certain age and you're likely to get this reaction: Her face lights up, and she's transported back to her childhood self — curled up with a book she knows will speak directly to her anxieties about relationships, self-image and measuring up.” —NPR.org
 
“Fans, readers, booksellers — even other authors and celebrities — often dissolve into tears upon meeting [Judy Blume], confessing that books like “Forever ... ” and “Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret” got them through adolescence; taught them about sex, love and friendship; and provided their first glimpse of adulthood.” —The New York Times 
 
“Blume wasn’t the first writer to legitimize and celebrate the interior life of young girls. . . . But Blume’s work feels significantly more influential than that of her predecessors and peers.” —The New Yorker
 
“These stories belong to young women. Real young women.” —Diablo Cody, Entertainment Weekly
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