Emily’s Rebellion: A business guide to designing better transactional services for the digital age

Technics Publications
Free sample

Emily is feeling rebellious. Emily – the embodiment of many young business people the authors have worked with on system projects – faces a wall of “you don’t understand how complex it is”.  She is told: “You do not have enough experience to make changes”, “Best we keep going with the current work the way it is”, and “We will think about improvements later.”  Emily becomes disillusioned and disempowered.

Emily’s Rebellion presents a new method of removing the complexity from business processes and information systems called the ‘Transaction Pattern’. Emily has learned about Service Design and loves it, but she needs a way to bridge the gap between her customer-focused service blueprint and the technical-minded developers.

The Transaction Pattern is Emily’s bridge. It breaks down a service design into transactions and then into a generic pattern of phases and tasks that commonly recur.  This structured approach, based on the pattern, readily specifies business requirements for system development and process implementation.

Emily’s Rebellion seeks to embolden people like Emily who are required to inhabit the space between the everyday operations of their business and technology ‘improvement’ and digitization projects. You can effect change today with simple steps – it does not have to be so complex.  Walk with Emily as she discovers a new path to get better business outcomes from IT projects.

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About the author

Lloyd Robinson and Graham Wilson have brought their rebellious approach to several major business system initiatives. Lloyd developed the Transaction Pattern over the last 20 years since specifying customer billing systems in the US, and Graham has helped Lloyd to refine the approach in large government projects in Australia.

Lloyd is a recognized authority on data management. Lloyd regularly consults and trains in data strategy and management across Australia. Lloyd is widely recognized as an engaging international conference speaker and a contributor to the practical development of the data management profession.

Graham is a business architect with 30 years' experience in Australian and New Zealand government agencies. Skilled at steering a path between business and IT, Graham has been responsible for guiding business representatives on the architecture of significant government initiatives.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Technics Publications
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Pages
372
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ISBN
9781634624633
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Corporate Governance
Business & Economics / Information Management
Computers / Enterprise Applications / Business Intelligence Tools
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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This book examines the link between change and project management and how creating a closer alignment between these two methodologies can yield greater benefits and mitigate elements of failure of information systems (IS) projects. This study explores the underlying challenges and practicalities of closer integration of the two disciplines and asserts that such a successful change goes beyond the simple training of project managers in the practitioner context. Instead, it requires organizations to conceptualize the necessary challenges to realize the potential benefits of this recommended integrated approach. The integration of both project and change management has been advocated in existing research, but the challenges of moving from a current position of separate methodologies, different standards bodies and in some cases totally separate organizational structures, is a step change for many organizations. Change initiatives where good change management practices are implemented, can increase the probability of successful organizational change. The tasks of leading and sustaining change can be complex and often entail the interplay of multiple factors involving action by people at every level of the business. This book offers a guide that identifies the barriers and major challenges that may arise in the development of the closer integration of change and project management. With a better understanding of these issues, organizations can avoid such pitfalls when establishing their own integrated approach.
"Despite spending more than $600 billion on information technology over the past decade, the Federal Government has achieved little of the productivity improvements that private industry has realized from IT" according to the 25 Point Implementation Plan to Reform Federal Information Technology Management published by the White House in late 2010. "Too often, Federal IT projects run over budget, behind schedule, or fail to deliver promised functionality." This book argues that the Federal Government needs a new approach. Introducing a novel five-step process called performance-driven management (PDM), author Ira Sachs explains in detail how to reduce risk on large IT programs and projects.

This book walks through the five steps of the PDM process:
conducting a high-level strategic review of what an organization does, who it serves, what it wants to do, and how it is going to do it;instituting performance measures to gauge success for the organization;completing comprehensive business cases for projects and using them to mitigate risk and manage projects throughout the project life cycle;performing benefits realization on completed projects; and establishing these best practices to achieve successful results in the future.

This is an essential tool for all IT and business managers in government and contractors doing business with the government, and it has much useful and actionable information for anyone who is interested in helping their business save money and take on effective, successful practices.
Sophie vanished - where did she go? For 100 years nobody knows.

A photo of 8 year old Sophie and an antique perfume bottle are found in the fireplace of an old house.

The story of a Balmain family over 170 years. Finally they uncover what happened.

Set around beautiful Sydney Harbour this is a story of this place and its people, an imagined history from early Australia to the present day.

Who was Sophie and what happened to her?

On buying an old weatherboard house in Balmain, Sydney, we discover her photo, dated 1900-1908, long hidden, along with a small perfume bottle in an old fireplace. Then we discover that Sophie disappeared with a childhood friend in 1908 and was never seem again, leaving a trail of sadness through generations of her family.

This book tracks the journey of the discovery of Sophie and her family, from their first arrival in Sydney, over five generations of the family, until the mystery is finally laid to rest.

It is a story of loss and grief, mixed with joy, which passes through the successive generations of a family. The way the family deals with unresolved tragedy and finally the the way their love transcends time is the story from which the real Sophie emerges.

Graham Wilson, the author, lived in the house in Balmain around which this story is based for seven years, before moving to Millers Point. This is his first novel.

Graham has previously written a family memoir, “Children of Arnhem’s Kaleidoscope” which describes his childhood, growing up in a aboriginal community in Western Arnhem Land. This is also available from this site.

The girl you love vanishes - you search and search. No trace of her is found.

You find one who looks just like her - her eyes see you but they do not know you, no recognition flickers - is it a mirage, dream or desperate hope?

She likes you. You ask and she comes with you. Her mind sees sunlight. You see dark shadowed edges.
Can you remake your life with a person who holds no memory of you. An unknown girl appears on an aboriginal community in far north Queensland. She has no memory of any life before, no one knows her.
Who is she? Where has she come from?
 She looks like a missing backpacker, Susan, she sounds like Susan, but her name is Jane. Her past life is an unknown place from where she knows no one. Now she has to try to make a new life without any connections to her past.

This is the final book of the Crocodile Spirit Dreaming Series. It tells the story of an English backpacker who went traveling in Outback Australia with a man who loved crocodiles, and how her life turned into a horror nightmare. Finally she gets her freedom only to disappear.

Susan was on trial for murder when she vanished. She had been just released on bail, despite pleading guilty, when new evidence indicating self-defense was found. She was also pregnant and expecting twins.

Since she has gone only a pair of shoes she was wearing have been found. They were next to a waterhole full of crocodiles. It is feared that she and her unborn children are dead, taken by crocodiles.

More than a year passes without any other trace of her. An inquest has made an open finding on her disappearance.

What is the link between Susan and this girl Jane who turns up out of nowhere, knowing no one, remembering nothing? Can this girl, Jane, build a new and happy life with just her two small children. Can a tragedy of the past ever be overcome?

This is the story of the remaking of a new life from the broken shell of the old - how memories of the old threaten to tear apart the new. And always, at the dark edge, lurks an ancient creature of the deep, a being whose lineage is the long lost Australian dreamtime, before the spirits made this land. Yet from this dark can come a new place, a place where sunlit shadows dance.

 

The dramatic inside story of the downfall of Michael Eisner—Disney Chairman and CEO—and the scandals that drove America’s best-known entertainment company to civil war.

“When You Wish Upon a Star,” “Whistle While You Work,” “The Happiest Place on Earth”—these are lyrics indelibly linked to Disney, one of the most admired and best-known companies in the world. So when Roy Disney, chairman of Walt Disney Animation and nephew of founder Walt Disney, abruptly resigned in November 2003 and declared war on chairman and chief executive Michael Eisner, he sent shock waves through the entertainment industry, corporate boardrooms, theme parks, and living rooms around the world—everywhere Disney does business and its products are cherished.

Drawing on unprecedented access to both Eisner and Roy Disney, current and former Disney executives and board members, as well as thousands of pages of never-before-seen letters, memos, transcripts, and other documents, James B. Stewart gets to the bottom of mysteries that have enveloped Disney for years: What really caused the rupture with studio chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg, a man who once regarded Eisner as a father but who became his fiercest rival? How could Eisner have so misjudged Michael Ovitz, a man who was not only “the most powerful man in Hollywood” but also his friend, whom he appointed as Disney president and immediately wanted to fire? What caused the break between Eisner and Pixar chairman Steve Jobs, and why did Pixar abruptly abandon its partnership with Disney? Why did Eisner so mistrust Roy Disney that he assigned Disney company executives to spy on him? How did Eisner control the Disney board for so long, and what really happened in the fateful board meeting in September 2004, when Eisner played his last cards?

DisneyWar is an enthralling tale of one of America’s most powerful media and entertainment companies, the people who control it, and those trying to overthrow them. It tells a story that—in its sudden twists, vivid, larger-than-life characters, and thrilling climax—might itself have been the subject of a Disney classic—except that it’s all true.
It was hot. There was sudden stillness in the late afternoon air and the surface of the small waterhole shone with unnatural smoothness. Fresh pig tracks at water's edge suggested pigs just gone. Two bubbles popped to the surface near the edge of the pool; just decaying vegetation, said my mind. I should have smelt crocodile!

A story of a missionary family in remote aboriginal Australia.

What is it about the Northern Territory that fascinates?

I have only to mention it’s name in conversation and people turn to listen.

Why, for 180 years, has it drawn people from all over to come, stay longer than they imagined and, often, never leave?
This book is a memoir of a family's life in a remote aboriginal community, in Australia's Northern Territory, something the equivalent of remote Canada or Alaska, where few people go.

The place Oenpelli,(now Gunbalanya) is near Kadadu National Park, made famous in Crocodile Dundee.

This story tells of changing world as a missionary family and an aboriginal community become part of modern Australia
This our family's story, growing amongst the people, animals and places and colours of this this strange land, alongside an aboriginal community going through its own changes; citizenship, alcohol, uranium mining, land rights, outstation development, and community self management.

It is a memoir of growing up in one of the most isolated parts of Australia - in a small aboriginal missionary community in the Northern Territory, something the equivalent of the remote Canada or Alaska. It is the landscape featured in the movie Crocodile Dundee.

It tells of the huge change in this place in the last half century with the coming of land rights and aboriginal self determination. It also tells of my mother and fathers lives and Christian beliefs which motivated their contribution to this change.

It is a story of my memories and love for this remote and beautiful place, in which I lived as a child then worked as an adult and of many NT characters who gave me the memories.It is also the story of me working as an adult across many parts of the NT and about the hardy, outlandish characters that inhabit this place.

It also tells of my own experience of surviving attack by a large crocodile in a remote swamp

It also provides a foundation for my novels in the Crocodile Spirit Dreaming Series. The places in these books are the places in which I lived and worked and many of the stories came little changed from people I knew. In particular my experience in surviving a crocodile attack of a large saltwater crocodile, which mauled my leg as told in this book forms part of the central role of the crocodile as a predator in this novel series.

The role of my father in opening road transport including building a crossing of the East Alligator River, developing outstations for aboriginal communities, learning to fly on missionary wages and establishing an aviation service along with assisting the aboriginal peoples of this land to gain royalties from mining is a story that deserves to be told as a major part of NT history. Along with his tireless work the contribution of many others is also an essential part of the story. 

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